4 PARA or RMR

Hello Gents, new here and after advice. Will probably get smashed for this but, never mind. I'm wanting to join either 4 PARA or RMR. Due to circumstances at home I'm unable to join the regulars. I am in a position where I could definitely commit to reserves though, and probably should have years ago. If I was to join the regs it would be Parachute Regiment for me. The problem I have deciding is due to hearing that 4 PARA lads who aren't ex-regs are looked upon with disdain. Whereas I understand that RMR are less so, because of passing the same tests. It may seem stupid but assuming I successfully join either unit, I hope I can serve for years and one day look back on a proud achievement. I can commit a lot of time to this and would be keen on spending a lot of time with the regs where possible. Even possibly a FTRS in the future. Always had my eye on the Parachute Regiment, but not as a second class member. Which is leading me more towards the RMR. I just wouldn't want to be in a group I've worked hard for, to be looked down upon. Does anyone have any experience of either unit? I understand I would have to prove myself as an individual regardless. Thanks.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
4 Para are not looked down on in distain. They have high standards, and work very closely with the regular Battalions. Are they the same? No. Will there be piss taking if you get mobilised or do FTRS? Yes. But then, assuming you are up to scratch, you will settle in, do your job well and earn your spurs. Plenty have done it before you. If you are a belter, you won’t. There have been a few of those too.

I would imagine life in the RMR would look very similar.
 
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4 Para are not looked down on in distain. They have high standards, and work very closely with the regular Battalions. Are they the same? No. Will there be piss taking if you get mobilised or do FTRS? Yes. But then, assuming you are up to scratch, you will settle in, do your job well and earn your spurs. Plenty have done it before you. If you are a belter, you won’t. There have been a few of those too.

I would imagine life in the RMR would look very similar.
Thanks for replying. I'd expect all the banter and expect to have to prove myself. Can I ask what you mean when you say they are different? May seem stupid to the likes of you who are experienced. Only I got told if I did ten years in 4 PARA I'd still not be considered " a para". Where as a marine reserve does exactly the same tests and is there purely to augment the regulars. After ten years in the RMR I'd be a "marine". I just want to be sure I'm committing to the right choice as I'm hoping its a long term part of my life. Thanks again for the help.
 
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chimera

LE
Moderator
Don't listen to what you are "told". Ten years in AR (in any unit), or ten years in RMR or RNR or RAFVR and you will still not be "the same" as full time professionals. You will be judged on committment and ability, so the advice would be just to get on and join and stop worrying about what "you are told" by other people.
 
Thanks for replying. I'd expect all the banter and expect to have to prove myself. Can I ask what you mean when you say they are different? May seem stupid to the likes of you who are experienced. Only I got told if I did ten years in 4 PARA I'd still not be considered " a para". Where as a marine reserve does exactly the same tests and is there purely to augment the regulars. After ten years in the RMR I'd be a "marine". I just want to be sure I'm committing to the right choice as I'm hoping its a long term part of my life. Thanks again for the help.
Don't kid yourself, after 10 years in the RMR you'd still be a 'Rubber Dagger'.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Thanks for replying. I'd expect all the banter and expect to have to prove myself. Can I ask what you mean when you say they are different? May seem stupid to the likes of you who are experienced. Only I got told if I did ten years in 4 PARA I'd still not be considered " a para". Where as a marine reserve does exactly the same tests and is there purely to augment the regulars. After ten years in the RMR I'd be a "marine". I just want to be sure I'm committing to the right choice as I'm hoping its a long term part of my life. Thanks again for the help.
You would not have followed the same path, being 26 weeks at Depot Para. If you go RMR, you would not have done the full RM recruits course. The tests are one thing. The “experience” of the regular recruit course is something entirely different. For some individuals, you will never close that gap. Others will take you on the basis of how you perform in Bn once you settle in.

A reservist (of whatever cap badge or beret colour) can not possibly reach and maintain the skill sets of a regular soldier in all aspects of the role. That is the “different”. A good reserve unit will focus on key skills and try to minimise that gap. Some things you just can’t cover or replicate in routine AR training, and you will really only get to grips with whilst mobilised.
 
Don't overlook the fact that regulars who arrive in unit also have to earn the respect of their peers.

That they have completed basic training and are wearing a coloured hat means nothing to those who have also met the minimum standards and subsequently built up skills and experience.

You'll never meet the approval of some individuals, no matter what you do.

"Not done your jumps yet? Pah"

"Got your wings, but no op tour yet? Pah"

"Only the one tour, and you didn't get malleted like I did? Pah"

"Tenerife for your holidays? Pah, should've gone to Elevenerife like I did".
 
You would not have followed the same path, being 26 weeks at Depot Para. If you go RMR, you would not have done the full RM recruits course. The tests are one thing. The “experience” of the regular recruit course is something entirely different. For some individuals, you will never close that gap. Others will take you on the basis of how you perform in Bn once you settle in.

A reservist (of whatever cap badge or beret colour) can not possibly reach and maintain the skill sets of a regular soldier in all aspects of the role. That is the “different”. A good reserve unit will focus on key skills and try to minimise that gap. Some things you just can’t cover or replicate in routine AR training, and you will really only get to grips with whilst mobilised.
sounds a bit like full time and retained fire service, however a couple of lads i know were put on a full whole time course as at the time they were unemployed,could the mod not look at someting like the reseve before ww1 where blokes could do basic then sign on reserve.ta for a contract number of years.
 
Thanks for all the replies. I see what you all mean. I suppose the only way I'd get past that is to be the highest quality I can be and earn the respect for my own skills.
 
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The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Thanks for all the replies. I see what you all mean. I suppose the only way I'd get passed that is to be the highest quality I can be and earn the respect for my own skills.
Yup. And accept that you will just not be able to get past it with some individuals. Quite interestingly, these won’t always be the “ultra warriors” they would like you to think them to be.

Accept it, move on, and just keep doing your best.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Visit both units. Pick the one you like the best.

Simple.
 

Dr Death

Old-Salt
Reserve Airborne Units attend a condensed 4 day Pre-Parachute Selection course tailored to their requirements.

The RMR Over a period of 12–15 months, recruits are required to attend training at their units, one evening a week and usually two weekends a month. Lots of physical fitness in own time, plenty of running is required. Then off to The Royal Marine Commando Training Centre for the Reserve Forces Commando Course Tests
 
Visit both units. Pick the one you like the best.

Simple.
This/\
Your unit will become your home, more than the wider regiment/service that you join.

Consider which unit is easiest to get to for a training night, for that will be the greatest influence on your commitment long-term. Then, as Ravers says, make an informed decision between unit, people in that unit, and how easy the commute is going to be on a weekday evening after you have finished a long day doing your real job.

As has been said piss taking will occur, regardless of service or commitment type, regular, reserve (wholetime or retained as @br9mp812 puts it) colour of beret, or whatever the old Colonels want stuck on it this week. What really matters is the content of your SJAR, and gaining the respect of those with whom you work.

I've worked with regulars, from all three services, whom would not last a day in a civilian job. It works both ways.

ISA - Visit the units first.
 
Thanks for the help everyone. Duke, that's what ill do, get my head down and let my own performance speak for me. I've visited my local 4 PARA det and had an informal chat. It was very positive.
RumRationReject, funny you say that, I've a close friend who's an SNCO and ML in the marines. I honestly don't think he would manage to make an account for this site, if he wanted to, he's backward. Need GCHQ to decipher his spelling. So if he tried to give me stick I've got plenty to go back haha. Thanks again everyone.
 

arcticfox042

War Hero
Thanks for the help everyone. Duke, that's what ill do, get my head down and let my own performance speak for me. I've visited my local 4 PARA det and had an informal chat. It was very positive.
RumRationReject, funny you say that, I've a close friend who's an SNCO and ML in the marines. I honestly don't think he would manage to make an account for this site, if he wanted to, he's backward. Need GCHQ to decipher his spelling. So if he tried to give me stick I've got plenty to go back haha. Thanks again everyone.
Well thats your opinion, this is Lord Burnetts opinion (extract from a speech he made in the House of Lords:
As a measure of that quality, approximately 17% of enlisted men passed for training have degrees, and 40% are educationally qualified to be officers. Those are fantastic statistics. The Royal Marines’ selection and training ensure that we have troops not only with stamina, strength, fortitude and courage, but also with high intelligence, flexibility and the ability to improvise. Officers, non-commissioned officers and marines have initiative and the highest standards. This is one of the reasons why we provide such a high proportion of the United Kingdom’s badged, regular Special Forces. Our Royal Marines can think for themselves and have a strong team spirit, comradeship, self-discipline and their own unique sense of humour. The Royal Marines—as I said, 4.5% of our Armed Forces—were awarded over 30% of the gallantry awards in Afghanistan. These outstanding men, to whom we owe so much, have the support and admiration of this House, the other place and the entire country. They are often called on to put their lives in mortal danger on our behalf. They give their wholehearted loyalties to this country, and it is time that this was reciprocated.

He also added "Most of the Para's I've met are total Mongs..........."
 
Well thats your opinion, this is Lord Burnetts opinion (extract from a speech he made in the House of Lords:
As a measure of that quality, approximately 17% of enlisted men passed for training have degrees, and 40% are educationally qualified to be officers. Those are fantastic statistics. The Royal Marines’ selection and training ensure that we have troops not only with stamina, strength, fortitude and courage, but also with high intelligence, flexibility and the ability to improvise. Officers, non-commissioned officers and marines have initiative and the highest standards. This is one of the reasons why we provide such a high proportion of the United Kingdom’s badged, regular Special Forces. Our Royal Marines can think for themselves and have a strong team spirit, comradeship, self-discipline and their own unique sense of humour. The Royal Marines—as I said, 4.5% of our Armed Forces—were awarded over 30% of the gallantry awards in Afghanistan. These outstanding men, to whom we owe so much, have the support and admiration of this House, the other place and the entire country. They are often called on to put their lives in mortal danger on our behalf. They give their wholehearted loyalties to this country, and it is time that this was reciprocated.

He also added "Most of the Para's I've met are total Mongs..........."
I used a specific example of my mate. He is as I claimed. It was just a little anecdote. I didn't, and would never, imply that all RM ranks are like him...
 

arcticfox042

War Hero
I used a specific example of my mate. He is as I claimed. It was just a little anecdote. I didn't, and would never, imply that all RM ranks are like him...
Thanks, I'm the same, I would never say that all Paras are mongs, I've only met a few hundred over the years..........
 

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