3D Printers - anyone got one?

Good old fashioned masking tape on my old Qidi.
The new one has a fancy flexi metal plate so its just been the pritt stick until the nozzle is carving through the glue and I have to wash it off.
Hairspray work well?
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Someone brought into the museum where I volunteer, a 3D plastic model of a Bren Gun Carrier which had been adapted for water crossing with oildrums strapped to either side.

And?

Nothing so special?

-Apparently it had been produced on a 3D printer by someone taking a digital image of multiple angles from a World War II original 2-D photograph......

eg
1641926530886.png

As someone who remembers half-crowns, and Woodpecker in quart glass bottles - its pretty amazing :)
 
Someone brought into the museum where I volunteer, a 3D plastic model of a Bren Gun Carrier which had been adapted for water crossing with oildrums strapped to either side.

And?

Nothing so special?

-Apparently it had been produced on a 3D printer by someone taking a digital image of multiple angles from a World War II original 2-D photograph......

eg View attachment 630624
As someone who remembers half-crowns, and Woodpecker in quart glass bottles - its pretty amazing :)
That's amazing - any pics of the 3D-printed result? (Incidentally, nice 2 Div marking on the carrier. The troops would be 1st Bn The Royal Scots or 1st Bn Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders; and there is quite a "79th angle" on one of the TOS's.)
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
When I'm back in the Museum, I'll see what I can scrounge up :)

( burnished my WW2 nerd cred by drawling ' hmmm, looks like something from Burma' and chuntering on about ' chaungs ' with a knowledgable air ! )


Turns out the flotation route had been carefully evaluated in 1942 by Royal Engineers in England who came up with the deliberately simplistic right angle bracket solution.

Imperial War Museum has some imagery - but needs to be negotiated :roll:

 
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I'm a Luddite. There, I've said it.

I hate computers - to me they are just another tool to be tolerated. I can get one out the box, transfer my old files and set up language and all that sort of stuff. Then we enter Satan's realm. When I have a problem and I'm told 'just click on X, then open Y and select Z, then........' I just glaze over. Rasberry Pi? Do I eat it or what?

BUT, I'd love a 3D printer and/or a laser cutter.

Is there anyone who could write and post a sticky (on the modelling pages?) from selecting, purchasing, box opening, setting up, linking to a computer, programs etc? Can I use an old laptop as the dedicated 'control panel, or whatever?
 
I'm a Luddite. There, I've said it.

I hate computers - to me they are just another tool to be tolerated. I can get one out the box, transfer my old files and set up language and all that sort of stuff. Then we enter Satan's realm. When I have a problem and I'm told 'just click on X, then open Y and select Z, then........' I just glaze over. Rasberry Pi? Do I eat it or what?

BUT, I'd love a 3D printer and/or a laser cutter.

Is there anyone who could write and post a sticky (on the modelling pages?) from selecting, purchasing, box opening, setting up, linking to a computer, programs etc? Can I use an old laptop as the dedicated 'control panel, or whatever?
I started out with my old laptop and went into the scary world of 3D websites & Youtube and after researching the world threw a couple of hundred at an X One 2 Qidi machine direct from them off Aliexpress.

A large box arrived when it was supposed to and everything I needed to start was in the box along with instructions and an 'Educational Guide' or instructions aimed at kids - very much childsplay :)

Downloaded the software, fed in the provided PLA and 'sliced' a file I'd got off Thingiverse and I was away with my my first print.

Only thing that was wrong with the machine was the hinge was broken on the door so I contacted Qidi and they sent me a new front and a load of spare nozzles and a few other odds and sods.
After that its very much hands on playing with settings an seeing what works and what doesn't and the joy of returning to a 4 hour print to find a filament nest.

I'm now fairly useful on Tinkercad as well - when I 'mowed' the wheel on the crappy lawnmower we had after it unscrewed itself it was an easy job to take a few measurements and print a new one in ABS.
 

endure

GCM
If you're looking for your first machine the Ender series are a good choice. They have a huge community to get help from but you might need to do a bit of tinkering to get it going properly.

There are good 'how to assemble it' vids on youtube.

They start at ~£150. Ender 3 3D Printer

If you're looking for something higher quality from the off there's none much better than the Prusa printers developed by Josef Prusa, the man who kicked the whole 3D thing off. They are more expensive though.

 
I'm a Luddite. There, I've said it.

I hate computers - to me they are just another tool to be tolerated. I can get one out the box, transfer my old files and set up language and all that sort of stuff. Then we enter Satan's realm. When I have a problem and I'm told 'just click on X, then open Y and select Z, then........' I just glaze over. Rasberry Pi? Do I eat it or what?

BUT, I'd love a 3D printer and/or a laser cutter.

Is there anyone who could write and post a sticky (on the modelling pages?) from selecting, purchasing, box opening, setting up, linking to a computer, programs etc? Can I use an old laptop as the dedicated 'control panel, or whatever?
I won’t make any recommendations about hardware, but I have tried a few 3D design softwares, and found Tinkercad to be the easiest. There is no need to download anything as it’s accessed via the web browser so you don’t need anything flashy PC-wise; you just need to be able to access the internet.

Designing with Tinkercad is fairly easy as it’s just a case of putting shapes together: if you want a tube, you pick a solid cylinder and drag it to the size you want. You then copy that cylinder, shrink its diameter, change it as an empty space, then centre it into the solid cylinder.

If you want a hollow box, it’s a hollow cube within a slightly bigger solid cube.

And so on.

By combining shapes and hollow shapes, you can get complex designs. Here’s an example.

1C7DEFA8-9F83-41FF-87CD-B6900D4D3A9A.jpeg

The difficult bit is working out how well each element will print, as that will determine how you design the model. But that will be trial and error depending on how well your printer works. In the above example, I kept the body in one piece as separate pieces always left a large and very visible seams.
 

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