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32 Years Ago today, and Tomorrow

As the sun sets tonight*, raise a glass.

32 years ago tonight, in the South Atlantic, hundreds of young British soldiers were making their way as stealthily as their combat loads would allow, toward the start lines (that's what proper speakers of the Queen's English call the Line of Departure) for the attacks on Mount Tumbledown and Wireless Ridge that would lead to the surrender of all the Argentinian forces on the islands, the following morning.

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/timeline_falklands_war_1982.htm
=====================
* Stonkernote: If I have it right, the clocks in that part of the world are 4 hours behind London time.
 
I'll raise a glass of quite an acceptable Argentinian Shiraz.

*searches for Charlie G*
 
The sun is just over the yardarm here so, with a very large Caol Ila single malt in front of me:

Here's to the guys that went there (I went later)
Here's to the guys who died there.
A minutes silence.....
Here's to the guys who were wounded.
Here's to the guys who weren't.
Heres to the backroom guys who planned the adventure.
Heres to the Islanders who supported us (99%).
Here's to the Yanks for giving us help in the back ground.
Here's to Maggie Thatcher who had the balls to make it happen (but who could have prevented the need for it).
Heres to the Argentine forces who fought, in the main, well, but who surrendered without causing mayhem amongst the civilian population, when their position became untenable.
Heres to the Argentine dead and wounded.
Here's a kick in the bollocks for successive governments who neglected the defence of the Falkland Islands over the years and made it necessary for us to reclaim them with blood.
And here's a kick in the bollocks for Galtiari, who caused the whole sad affair.
And here's a kick in the bollocks for those who, to save money, put all the major assets on one ship, the Atlantic Conveyor, thus endangering the whole operation and costing us lives.
Salut!

The term "Guys" includes males, females, gay padres with rumpled uniforms, gays, lesbians, cross dressers, anyone who is unsure of their sexuality, cavalry officers, and anyone who I have omitted.
 
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ADBO

LE
I'd already decided that I wanted to join up - this merely confirmed it to an (easily) impressible 16 year old. Did 9 months there years later and learnt that: a) they really are patriotic b) it was the functioning alcoholics paradise and c) never, ever, drink with submariners. Despite later interactions with Paras, seeing what they achieved at Tumbledown etc. still leaves me in awe.
sent after copious amounts of vodka
 
Glass was well and truly raised last night

Written by a very good friend of mine

The Guardsman

The Guardsman sits and wonders why,
The Guardsman’s family begin to cry
The Guardsman’s wife she holds him tight
for soon it’s off for a war to fight

The Guardsman fights to keep us free
yes my friends that is you and me
The Guardsman stands so proud and tall
The Guardsman’s eyes have seen it all

The Guardsman is hit on the mountain top
The Guardsman lies bleeding by craggy crop
The Guardsman’s mates fight to save his life
Spare a thought for the Guardsman’s wife

The Guardsman dies as his mate look on
The Guardsman weeps for his life now gone
The Guardsman stands guard at heavens gates
and there he’ll wait for all his mates


Bill McDowall

As the 13th\14th June approach I will remember our 9 fallen comrades who paid the ultimate price on Mount Tumbledown.

Guardsman Derek James Denholm, aged 24
Guardsman David Malcolmson, aged 20.
Lance sergeant Clark Mitchell, aged 26
Guardsman James Reynolds, DCM, aged 18
Sergeant John Jamieson Simeon, aged 36
Guardsman Archibald Striling, aged 21
Guardsman Ronald Tanbini, aged 25
Warrant officer class 2 Daniel Wight, aged 37
L/Cpl John Pashley, 9 Para Squadron, Royal Engineers
 

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Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
And here's a kick in the bollocks for those who, to save money, put all the major assets on one ship, the Atlantic Conveyor, thus endangering the whole operation and costing us lives..

And here's to Captain Ian North, Merchant Navy - master of said vessel who lost his life along with 6 members of his crew ( and 6 attached RN and RFA) when his vessel was hit by two AM39 Exocet missiles fired by Super Etendard ac flown by Roberto Curilovic and his wingman Julio Barrazza of the Argentinian Navy.


Captain North was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Believed to have swum away from a liferaft saying that it was already overcrowded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Atlantic_Conveyor

A complete account of the ship's role here
Atlantic-Conveyor-sailing-South-01.jpg
 
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the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
And here's to Captain Ian North, Merchant Navy - master of said vessel who lost his life along with 6 members of his crew ( and 6 attached RN and RFA) when his vessel was hit by two AM39 Exocet missiles fired by Super Etendard ac flown by Roberto Curilovic and his wingman Julio Barrazza of the Argentinian Navy.


Captain North was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Believed to have swum away from a liferaft saying that it was already overcrowded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Atlantic_Conveyor

A complete account of the ship's role here
Atlantic-Conveyor-sailing-South-01.jpg


I was on detachment with 1 (F) Sqn in Inverness in 1990
A few of the lads had these snug warm suits whilst the rest of us froze.

Turned out they got those suits on the conveyor when it was hit and they went overboard.
 

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