30 years since Chernobyl

#41
there was a minute by minute account in a Sunday paper recently. I had to stop reading it because the criminal stupidity of everybody responsible for the accident appalled me.

Don't tell me how it finishes. I haven't watched it yet.
In fairness, Chernobyl happening probably meant we (the world collectively) learnt a lot more about radiation, it’s effects etc

I had probably just about started primary school at the time
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#42
In fairness, Chernobyl happening probably meant we (the world collectively) learnt a lot more about radiation, it’s effects etc

I had probably just about started primary school at the time
They say that Gorbachev and Reagan had a collective wtf at the effects of radiation and each realised that nobody would win a nuclear war, leading to the end of the Cold War.
 
#43
We watched the first episode last night. It's horrifying, but I was impressed by the way it went straight into the event, How accurate is it, is there a written record in Soviet files that's not classified?
@KGB_resident will be along shortly to confirm the official Soviet record

1509219336_nothing-to-see-here-gif-4.gif
 
#44
Anybody watched the first episode of the HBO miniseries Chernobyl yet?
It's very good and the attention to detail is to be applauded. It's done in a very matter of fact way with no over dramatization and seems to be covering all events very factually. It gets right into it too with the reactor blowing in the first few mins. There is no character build up and just introduces them as and when they appear in the storyline. A bit like a docudrama.
Highly recommended.

It was very good

I did find that they could have explained what was happening a bit more.

Eg they said there was graphite found on the ground outside but didn’t explain what that indicated.... my very basic knowledge knew that was bad (I knew it was likely to be found in the reactor itself and be very radioactive)

Maybe it will be explained later
 
#45
It was very good

I did find that they could have explained what was happening a bit more.

Eg they said there was graphite found on the ground outside but didn’t explain what that indicated.... my very basic knowledge knew that was bad (I knew it was likely to be found in the reactor itself and be very radioactive)

Maybe it will be explained later

I thought the lack of detailed explanation was intended to convey that there was a distinct lack of understanding on site at the time about what was going on.
 
#46
I thought the lack of detailed explanation was intended to convey that there was a distinct lack of understanding on site at the time about what was going on.
That's the way I took it as well, the same with the onlookers at the bridge, "It looks pretty doesn't it?" as the radioactive dust is beginning to fall.
 
#47
I was in Berlin at the time, keeping a close eye on the prevailing winds!
Everyone was going out to the local restaurants and ordering chicken Kievs!...

.....squaddies eh.
 
#48
That's the way I took it as well, the same with the onlookers at the bridge, "It looks pretty doesn't it?" as the radioactive dust is beginning to fall.
Years back we had training from a guy that worked at Harwell, some of his tales were so bad they were nearly funny,
like the "terry fuckwitts" who found a dumped x ray scanner chopped it up,found pretty powder in side and used it for body painting.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#49
Years back we had training from a guy that worked at Harwell, some of his tales were so bad they were nearly funny,
like the "terry fuckwitts" who found a dumped x ray scanner chopped it up,found pretty powder in side and used it for body painting.
There was a news report a decade or two back about a couple of guys in rural Brazil, nicked an X-ray machine and broke it up for scrap. Irradiated half the village.
 
#51
It was very good

I did find that they could have explained what was happening a bit more.

Eg they said there was graphite found on the ground outside but didn’t explain what that indicated.... my very basic knowledge knew that was bad (I knew it was likely to be found in the reactor itself and be very radioactive)

Maybe it will be explained later
I think the point is that we are supposed to see it as it happened without the explanation, until the answers are forthcoming. The last scene showed that poor bastard who they sent onto the roof to look into the exposed core being berated by the bosses.
I don't think at that point they actually know what the true extent of the damage is and the graphite being spread far and wide.
I'm hoping the last episode or so would contain the official inquiry into the disaster (if the Russians actually did one and not a whitewash), but as it stands, it's a fantastic first episode of a truly horrific event.
 
#52
30 years ago today, an event that changed thinking and opinion on the nuclear power industry. Can anyone else remember it? I was working in the nuclear industry at the time.

Chernobyl disaster: Ukraine marks 30th anniversary - BBC News
Of course I remeber it pretty well including the attempts of Soviet agitprop to silence the scale of the disaster.
That time my late Father (KGB colonel) was sent for 30 days to the 30-km zone to supervise security measures and he was not alone. His collegues also spent a month with similar missions.
My cousin Nikolay that time lived and worked on the large nuclear plant near the city of Tomsk in Siberia (my parents and all their relatives are from Tomsk region). He was proposed to work on Chernobyl power plant after the catastrophe. He agreed. After collapse of the Soviet union he became Ukrainian citizen, retired later, baught a house in Crimea and ... in 2014 again became Russian citizen
I'm not connected to the nuclear industry. Though the last year I visited the nuclear plant near Sankt-Peterburg to consult local personnel about Israeli made meters and power measurement equipment that is widely being used on Russian nuclear plants.

As for the causes then just before the catastrophe the personnel violated a lot of instructions and directives, didn't pay attention to warning signals and even switched off some important security systems. Hower the main causes are connected with the design of the reactor that was on some points imperfect.
 
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#53
Of course I remeber it pretty well including the attempts of Soviet agitprop to silence the scale of the disaster.
That time my late Father (KGB colonel) was sent for 30 days to the 30-km zone to supervise security measures and he was not alone. His collegues also spent a month with similar missions.
My cousin Nikolay that time lived and worked on the large nuclear plant near the city of Tomsk in Siberia (my parents and all their relatives are from Tomsk region). He was proposed to work on Chernobyl power plant after the catastrophe. He agreed. After collapse of the Soviet union he became Ukrainian citizen, retired later, baught a house in Crimea and ... in 2014 again became Russian citizen
I'm not connected to the nuclear industry. Though the last year I visited the nuclear plant near Sankt-Peterburg to consult local personnel about Israli made meters and power measurement equipment that is widely being used on Russian nuclear plants.

As for the causes then just before the catastrophe the personnel violated a lot of instructions and directives, didn't pay attention to warning signals and even switched off some important security systems. Hower the main causes are connected with the design of the reactor that was on some points imperfect.
What work did your cousin do at Chernobyl and what did he say about it afterwards?
 
#54
What work did your cousin do at Chernobyl and what did he say about it afterwards?
He was at time a young engineer and worked in Seversk (Tomsk area) nuclear plant in reactor zone. Btw, my another cousin (also Sergey Poleshchuk as me) and his Father, my uncle worked on the plant for decades. The plant's production is military one and thus there was military discipline. According to my cousin after the disaster the same level of discipline was established on the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. The personnel worked strictly according to instructions and directives. The remaining 3 reactors were functioning in standard carefully calculated regimes.

The catastrophe happened then the 4th reactor worked in special regime - it had half power as nuclear fuel was almost 'burnt'. In special 'experimental' regime the protective rods designed to stop the reactor (using neurton slowing and capturing features) were almost all fully extracted. During so called 'experiment' the automatic system that manages the rods was switched off. When power of the reactor increased, the rods were put down manually but it was too late. Water in the reactor that has also neutron slowing feature almost evaporated.
 
#55
I came across this video, I think it's pretty good, original footage of the immediate aftermath with narration from a surviving member of the team, translated into English.


 
#56
I came across this video, I think it's pretty good, original footage of the immediate aftermath with narration from a surviving member of the team, translated into English.


An informative film, and you can see all the abandoned shovels on the reactor building room when they go up there.
I wasn't aware that it was graphite up there as well, that stuff must have been spread far and wide.
 

R0B

Old-Salt
#57
There was a documentary on one of the Sky channels a while back that described the problem as a feedback loop issue. (It was a while back some this is the best I can do from memory).

The plant only had the electricity it generated itself and there was a fine balance between not having enough water to cool the reactor and having too much that steam wasn't produced to generate power.

They added too much water then when the power started to fail they removed rods to heat the water quicker which then caused the water to heat too quickly needing more cold water until the power eventually failed and they couldn't lower the rods to control the reaction or pump more water in.
 

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