3 decades ago on this day ...

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
With only a few weeks since I had finished PQO 1/90 I made myself available to give suitable tactical advice if required.
 
Which would have brought the allied forces into combat before they had time to map the Iraqi air defences and devise countermeasures. Also Saddam's hardened aircraft shelters may have afforded real protection had the planners not had time to study the building plans.

Saddam gambled on the Americans being unwilling to fight.
The Coalition knew exactly what they were up against, certainly wrt KAF Ali Al Salem.

A German company had built the HAS and the construction template was . . . errm . . . made known. Later, 2 days after peace broke out, I had the opportunity to view those same HAS.

It was as though a giant had poked his finger into the roof. Like a naughty school boy.

. . . and now, some trivia:

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Desert Storm note paper 001.jpg


OORAH!
 
I was at Winterbourne Gunner.

The first week on the NBC Officers’ course, the DS were weeping and wailing about the Peace Dividend and the effect on the NBC world.

That weekend, Saddam invades.

Week 2, suddenly a lot more interest amongst the students...
 
Was at SEME - VM (U) Course.

The Air War started the day after we finished and started stagging on for a week waiting to be posted.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I was recalled from Christmas leave, having just done a weeks duty and been away for 9 months in 90 When I arrived in Plymouth, the sub was being stored for war and receiving a full load if torpedoes. We sailed a few days later, destination only known to the Command team. We arrived in our ops box and proceeded to silently go about being menacingly undetected. Fun times, and no medal, as we were outside of the qualifying area.

The most amusing bit was, as the sub had been resupplied quickly, normally food would be stored in weeks worth of menus. In this case, it was stored as it turned up. So we had to eat through the bread mix to get to the next stuff etc :)
 
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4(T)

LE
I was OC of a unit within the LPBG (Lead Parachute Battalion Group). On the night of the invasion we'd been out with other bde units on an overnight speed tab/race along the South Downs Way. When we got to the finish line at about 0200, we were told our transport was taking us directly to an airfield for immediate lift to the Middle East.

Rumour even had it that they were trying to find the blokes with the keys to Farnborough, in order to have a quicker emplanement there, rather than drive everything over to Brize/ Lynham/ S Cerney.

Luckily someone then thought it might be a good idea if we went back to 'shot to pick up some kit. Just as well, 'cos many of the boys had been using "racing bergans" containing house bricks and blankets to make up the weight! We'd have arrived in the combat zone with enough masonry to build a BBQ and nice patio; the stuff of ally legends, but...

We had no desert kit of course, but pretty much everyone wore junglies and jungle boots anyway (these were ally times) so it was a matter of extra water bottles and, er, thats it. QMs and armouries open - take what you think you need. Extra mags, G1098, bergan back straps (rocking horse poo). There was even talk of two sausages for breakfast, if we were still in camp by then.

There then followed the most intense period of on-the-bus/ off-the-bus activity I think I'd ever experienced. Phones ringing off the hook, flash signals arriving by DR, duty wallahs taking down order and counter order. "You're to go and pick up mob stock at Kineton, and..." "Its a three hour drive from here" "Oh, stand fast, Wait out." Etc.

Anyway, as history records, we ended up not going on our "a camel too far" adventure. We collectively sat on our Bergans for about 12 hours before it was all knocked on the head. QMs then got their strop on, demanding to see all their stores returned and, no, there were definitely no extra sausages for breakfast.


Later we ended up picking up shed loads of commitments dropped by the heavy metal units that went to Kuwait. For about four months we were doing back-to-back overseas ex Cyprus - Kenya - Malaysia - Canada - BAOR - et al. Fun times, but we'd have rather have just gone for it and been dropped into Kuwait.
 
I was OC of a unit within the LPBG (Lead Parachute Battalion Group). On the night of the invasion we'd been out with other bde units on an overnight speed tab/race along the South Downs Way. When we got to the finish line at about 0200, we were told our transport was taking us directly to an airfield for immediate lift to the Middle East.

Rumour even had it that they were trying to find the blokes with the keys to Farnborough, in order to have a quicker emplanement there, rather than drive everything over to Brize/ Lynham/ S Cerney.

Luckily someone then thought it might be a good idea if we went back to 'shot to pick up some kit. Just as well, 'cos many of the boys had been using "racing bergans" containing house bricks and blankets to make up the weight! We'd have arrived in the combat zone with enough masonry to build a BBQ and nice patio; the stuff of ally legends, but...

We had no desert kit of course, but pretty much everyone wore junglies and jungle boots anyway (these were ally times) so it was a matter of extra water bottles and, er, thats it. QMs and armouries open - take what you think you need. Extra mags, G1098, bergan back straps (rocking horse poo). There was even talk of two sausages for breakfast, if we were still in camp by then.

There then followed the most intense period of on-the-bus/ off-the-bus activity I think I'd ever experienced. Phones ringing off the hook, flash signals arriving by DR, duty wallahs taking down order and counter order. "You're to go and pick up mob stock at Kineton, and..." "Its a three hour drive from here" "Oh, stand fast, Wait out." Etc.

Anyway, as history records, we ended up not going on our "a camel too far" adventure. We collectively sat on our Bergans for about 12 hours before it was all knocked on the head. QMs then got their strop on, demanding to see all their stores returned and, no, there were definitely no extra sausages for breakfast.


Later we ended up picking up shed loads of commitments dropped by the heavy metal units that went to Kuwait. For about four months we were doing back-to-back overseas ex Cyprus - Kenya - Malaysia - Canada - BAOR - et al. Fun times, but we'd have rather have just gone for it and been dropped into Kuwait.
Now that's the Army I remember so fondly.
 
I was OC of a unit within the LPBG (Lead Parachute Battalion Group). On the night of the invasion we'd been out with other bde units on an overnight speed tab/race along the South Downs Way. When we got to the finish line at about 0200, we were told our transport was taking us directly to an airfield for immediate lift to the Middle East.

Rumour even had it that they were trying to find the blokes with the keys to Farnborough, in order to have a quicker emplanement there, rather than drive everything over to Brize/ Lynham/ S Cerney.

Luckily someone then thought it might be a good idea if we went back to 'shot to pick up some kit. Just as well, 'cos many of the boys had been using "racing bergans" containing house bricks and blankets to make up the weight! We'd have arrived in the combat zone with enough masonry to build a BBQ and nice patio; the stuff of ally legends, but...

We had no desert kit of course, but pretty much everyone wore junglies and jungle boots anyway (these were ally times) so it was a matter of extra water bottles and, er, thats it. QMs and armouries open - take what you think you need. Extra mags, G1098, bergan back straps (rocking horse poo). There was even talk of two sausages for breakfast, if we were still in camp by then.

There then followed the most intense period of on-the-bus/ off-the-bus activity I think I'd ever experienced. Phones ringing off the hook, flash signals arriving by DR, duty wallahs taking down order and counter order. "You're to go and pick up mob stock at Kineton, and..." "Its a three hour drive from here" "Oh, stand fast, Wait out." Etc.

Anyway, as history records, we ended up not going on our "a camel too far" adventure. We collectively sat on our Bergans for about 12 hours before it was all knocked on the head. QMs then got their strop on, demanding to see all their stores returned and, no, there were definitely no extra sausages for breakfast.


Later we ended up picking up shed loads of commitments dropped by the heavy metal units that went to Kuwait. For about four months we were doing back-to-back overseas ex Cyprus - Kenya - Malaysia - Canada - BAOR - et al. Fun times, but we'd have rather have just gone for it and been dropped into Kuwait.
A Camel Too Far, I like that. We were also part of what was then 5 Airborne, lots of excitement but most of us knew we wouldn't go. I was stuck in FI anyway as part of the RIC, I don't think we got back until November. We were also due to move to sunny Tidworth the following January. 3 RRF deployed from Germany as they were a Warrior battalion and it was going to be an armoured battle. A number of us, including me, asked if we could go over to make up numbers but a load of TA guys went instead.
 

Chef

LE
I was doing a gunnery course at Lulworth 9-4, no homework and the pub a short walk down the hill. Happy days.
 
Was attached to 16/5L in Herford. We were told not to worry as we wouldn't be involved in anything if it did kick off. We were informed that we would be prepping our kit for war and handing it over to units that were going. How wrong could you be?
 
There was a STAB RE squadron (873) that specialised in searchlights.

For years they had faithfully turned up on other people’s exercises or firepower demonstrations to show how they could light up a battlefield.

Someone then decided that they would need this skill on GRANBY. There was much rejoicing amongst said STABs.

Then someone decided that the STABs had to hand over their lights to a regular infantry unit. But they would have to use their MTD to prep the lights and train the infantry how to use them.

Bitter? When they were re-roled to EOD a year or so later they were still complaining about it. They’d haemorrhaged bods as a result.

A shining example of how we (the regulars) didn’t know how to treat volunteers. I wonder how the AR experience is these days?
 

ABNredleg

War Hero
We had jumped into Fort Chafee, Arkansas, as part of a battalion rotation to the Joint Readiness Training Center, and while at the rendezvous point heard the cadre talk about the invasion. Didn’t have time to think about it as Blackhawks were inbound to conduct an air assault from the DZ. One week later they ended the exercise and sent us back to Bragg - on our way to Saudi (via Germany) on August 19th.
 

Dr Death

War Hero
I had just finished being a Surgical SHO & was on the road to being Surgical Reg, oh the dizzy heights.
Was shagging nice fit young nubile nurses & enjoying life.
 
I was recalled from Christmas leave, having just done a weeks duty and been away for 9 months in 90 When I arrived in Plymouth, the sub was being stored for war and receiving a full load if torpedoes. We sailed a few days later, destination only known to the Command team. We arrived in our ops box and proceeded to silently go about being menacingly undetected. Fun times, and no medal, as we were outside of the qualifying area.

The most amusing bit was, as the sub had been resupplied quickly, normally food would be stored in weeks worth of menus. In this case, it was stored as it turned up. So we had to eat through the bread mix to get to the next stuff etc :)
The Navy celebrates Christmas in August ?
 
There was a STAB RE squadron (873) that specialised in searchlights.

For years they had faithfully turned up on other people’s exercises or firepower demonstrations to show how they could light up a battlefield.

Someone then decided that they would need this skill on GRANBY. There was much rejoicing amongst said STABs.

Then someone decided that the STABs had to hand over their lights to a regular infantry unit. But they would have to use their MTD to prep the lights and train the infantry how to use them.

Bitter? When they were re-roled to EOD a year or so later they were still complaining about it. They’d haemorrhaged bods as a result.

A shining example of how we (the regulars) didn’t know how to treat volunteers. I wonder how the AR experience is these days?
Irony?
The reserve has been likened to a temping agency, but everyone's experience is different.
 

BratMedic

LE
Book Reviewer
Jabby McJabface:

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An excited voice in the corridor suggested that I should check over the DDT ( Defence Debriefing Team ) equipment. Having added three extra note pads and a dozen pencils, i reported the status "operational". :)

Now for the real challenge, all those 'schoolies' with Arab linguist abilities were called for. That was interesting, as several felt that their gained skills at Beaconsfield weren't actually meant for use in war.

The reservist element of our three services gave sterling service on their aspect of DDT as the refugees arrived at London and Gatwick debriefing those who came forward to offer advice on their experiences in Kuwait and the locale.
 
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