2nd SEAl Killed Free Fall training in Arizona

Discussion in 'Multinational HQ' started by Trip_Wire, Mar 10, 2008.

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  1. Trip_Wire

    Trip_Wire RIP

    TUCSON REGION

    SEALs halt training after 2nd chutist dies

    By Aaron Mackey
    ARIZONA DAILY STAR
    Tucson, Arizona | Published: 03.08.2008

    Navy officials have suspended parachute training at a facility near Marana after the second SEAL in less than a month died in an accident there.

    The latest incident occurred at about 8 a.m. Thursday when a SEAL suffered fatal injuries during parachute training at Pinal Airpark, according to a news release from the Navy's Special Warfare Command.
    The SEAL was flown to University Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.

    Link:

    http://www.azstarnet.com/metro/228705
     
  2. Trip_Wire

    Trip_Wire RIP

    sandmanfez:

    The Army's free fall school has a much better safety record. SEALs have sort of a reputation of playing fast and loose in their training with safety factors, etc. (At least that is rumored.)

    As for the one in the video, I wouldn't do that myself, No way! I have been to the Army's HALO school at the Test center, at Yuma, AZ and done some civilian 'skydiving' as well in the past.

    I don't know what the altitude was on that jump; however, I suspect it was high enough to be pretty cold, for what he seemed to be wearing.

    Also keep in my most, of the advanced military jumps at the school, are made with weapons, ruck and other team equipment as well as on oxygen. Many are night operations as well.
     
  3. You're right Trip, the SEALs approach to training may sometimes be categorised by the term "cowboy".
    Its all a question of tempo. Army SF are the steady, reliable, "get the job done" guys, whereas, USN SEALs could be veiwed as exponents of the high tempo "gung ho" approach to conflict resolution. Thankfully, there is room for both schools of thought.
     
  4. that is mad!
     
  5. I should just point out that.....

    A. Don't try that at home kids.

    and.......

    B. Travis Alan Pastrana (born October 8, 1983, in Annapolis, Maryland) is a motorsports competitor who has won championships and X Games gold medals in several events, including supercross, motocross, freestyle motocross, and rally racing.
    He's not a SEAL, just a full on nutjob.

    C. Listen to your parents, don't do drugs and don't exit an aircraft without a parachute unless its stationary.
     
  6. "You're right Trip, the SEALs approach to training may sometimes be categorised by the term "cowboy".
    Its all a question of tempo. Army SF are the steady, reliable, "get the job done" guys, whereas, USN SEALs could be veiwed as exponents of the high tempo "gung ho" approach to conflict resolution. Thankfully, there is room for both schools of thought."

    The difference is the level of maturity, in which the SEALs are sadly lacking (they tend to be younger than Army SF guys). Individually, they're beasts, but as a group they leave something to be desired IMO. As for the SEALs clickish "my way or the highway" gung ho approach, it hasn't worked since Nam, and quite frankly it's gotten a lot of them killed over the years in both training and operations.
     
  7. Trip_Wire

    Trip_Wire RIP

    From what I know of their various publicly released operations and published training accidents and hearing reports from other Spec. Ops. people. Sadly, I must agree with you. :cry:
     
  8. Its a fair comment G_S.
    Sadly, the pool from which SEALs are recruited, has historically been a shallow one. There are not many opportunities within the USN to develop the kind of infantry based skill-set required for SF.
    Fleet have always had to try and balance the benefits of increased maturity against the handicap of age, unlike their Army and Marine Corps counterparts.
    The good news?
    It is now possible for serving Officers to transfer in from other services, and for enlisted candidates from other services to apply upon completion of contract.
    Only time will tell, but hopefully, seasoning the pot with a little Army/USMC talent will create a quantum leap in operational effectivity.

    Hooyah! :)