1980/90's Northern Ireland waterproof jacket - why?

#1
Denizens of Arrse...

being very, very bored on this sunday afternoon, i thought i'd ask the collective wisdom why the Army required, then issued, the olive green 'NI issue' waterproof jacket?

what was the thinking that required two waterproof jackets - one for NI, and one for, err... exactly the same rain everywhere else, and why did they decide that despite people being shot there on a regular basis, it should not be in DPM, but instead in Olive Green?

i use one on the farm, find it comfortable and practical, but i don't understand the reasons for its existance, or indeed why the same design was not used elsewhere...
 
#2
Denizens of Arrse...

being very, very bored on this sunday afternoon, i thought i'd ask the collective wisdom why the Army required, then issued, the olive green 'NI issue' waterproof jacket?

what was the thinking that required two waterproof jackets - one for NI, and one for, err... exactly the same rain everywhere else, and why did they decide that despite people being shot there on a regular basis, it should not be in DPM, but instead in Olive Green?

i use one on the farm, find it comfortable and practical, but i don't understand the reasons for its existance, or indeed why the same design was not used elsewhere...
A better question might be when was the phrase "ally" first coined.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#3
It wasn't an NI issue, I suspect you are thinking about the cold weather OG waterproof which was often a crab issue. During all of my tours/visits to the province all issued Infantry waterproofs were DPM crisp packets followed by the later gore tex. Waterproofs were banned during marching season in the cities for sensible reasons.
 
#4
Indeed, Ugly is right about the plain jkt being an RAF issue. We only had the DPM issued to us, but to be honest, the plain waterproof was better due to having meshing under the armpit, allowing for condensation to be dispersed quicker. Plus the pockets were more functional than the Army issue. That changed with the advent of the DPM Gore tex, which was better than both. Mind you anything was better than the poncho, unless you had to make a basha of course?
 
#5
You've baffled me. My last tour was South Armagh in 87 and we were issued with a DPM Goretex Jacket. We dare not wear it though as the QM threatened to bill us for any rips, which, when in Blackthorne Country are going to be a tad numerous.
 
#6
Indeed, Ugly is right about the plain jkt being an RAF issue. We only had the DPM issued to us, but to be honest, the plain waterproof was better due to having meshing under the armpit, allowing for condensation to be dispersed quicker. Plus the pockets were more functional than the Army issue. That changed with the advent of the DPM Gore tex, which was better than both. Mind you anything was better than the poncho, unless you had to make a basha of course?
They had more sweets to carry
 
#7
You've baffled me. My last tour was South Armagh in 87 and we were issued with a DPM Goretex Jacket. We dare not wear it though as the QM threatened to bill us for any rips, which, when in Blackthorne Country are going to be a tad numerous.
Don't be baffled ACAB, we in 62 troop didn't get the goretex issue till someone from 6 Air Mobile Bde authorised it. Not sure how that worked, but it was better than being wet inside and out, as per the old plastic abomination.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
Don't be baffled ACAB, we in 62 troop didn't get the goretex issue till someone from 6 Air Mobile Bde authorised it. Not sure how that worked, but it was better than being wet inside and out, as per the old plastic abomination.
Hey - nowt better than that slightly 'marinaded' feeling of the old non-breathable waterproof...
 
#9
Hey - nowt better than that slightly 'marinaded' feeling of the old non-breathable waterproof...
Would that be the old 'Crisp Packet' waterproofs?

Useless piece of crap.
 
#11
Exactly the one. Best I ever managed was using it as an insulating layer when on stag in a harbour area (shivering in a hole in the ground, individuals for the use of...).
Agreed, you certainly didn't want to do anything physical in it, even a recce patrol, as you would be soaked to the skin with condensation afterwards.

And that takes me back. Who remembers doing Recce Patrols with nothing more than an SLR sling around your waist and a mag of 20 in your top left pocket?
 
#13
Err... what are waterproofs ? in 79/80 I'd to make do with my washed out combat jacket which had long since lost its waterproofness possibly due to giving it a constant wash with the power washer .
 
#15
In the 70's, we had to buy any waterproof covers that we needed. The only thing the army had was the cape which was handy for bashering up but not suitably lightweight or ideal for crashing through hedgerows and constantly running around in on a patrol.

This was also in the days before goretex was common so the kit had to be waterproof, strong enough to stand the abuse and generously cut so you could circulate the air around underneath it to prevent condensation. DPM waterproofs were very much unheard of in those days. It was all plain olive green.

They usually sourced something that was going to do the job from a bulk seller and got a deal that cost around a fiver per waterproof which wasn't the end of the world for a decent bit of kit that was going to hopefully keep you dry for the tour.

Here's a couple of pics from Armagh in the mid seventies with some examples of what we used to get.



 
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skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
It indeed was, but working in a bomb dump in a nylon jacket was a no no, so we had the ultimate N.I. waterproof.......
A Donkey Jacket :)
The Coop.
I got half a dozen from one of their depots. Plastic interior shoulders to keep the rain off and deep pockets. The ultimate coat to dump in the boot.

Nowadays hipsters refer to them as a pea coat.
 

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