1945 1st Parachute Brigade in Denmark

Lilie Molle has he tits and box out on the first page of this web site, so it looks promising!
 
Lilie Molle has he tits and box out on the first page of this web site, so it looks promising!
Keep going - there are literally hundreds of colour slides of the liberation of Denmark - especially the Home Army and the German Surrender.

If you put in the search word "dias", they will all come up....
 

Awol

LE
Keep going - there are literally hundreds of colour slides of the liberation of Denmark - especially the Home Army and the German Surrender.

If you put in the search word "dias", they will all come up....
Real colour or colourised? In other words someone's best guess.

Either way, great pics.
 
Wonder if this was a similar policing action like 1st Airborne Div did during Operation Doomsday in Norway in '45.
 
Lilie Molle has he tits and box out on the first page of this web site, so it looks promising!
Point of order; Lille Mølle (Little Mill residence) is the house in Copenhagen, now a museum. The painting is by Oscar Matthiesen, 1945, depicting Leda the Spartan queen. He usually painted her that way but someone's nicked her Swan.

Cracking thread and photos there.
 
Great find, interesting website for sure.
The missus is now looking through 518 pics just relating to her town (obviously long before her time but the buildings are very familiar to both of us).
A very nice way for some to end their war I would say.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Wonder if this was a similar policing action like 1st Airborne Div did during Operation Doomsday in Norway in '45.
Possibly Op Blackout, led by 15/19H, to round up the Doenitz Nazi government in Flensburg?
 
This might be the Liberation of Copenhagen in May 1945; 1 Para Bde were under 6th Airborne as the first Para Brigade in the British Army. They landed south of Copenhagen on V.E. day, outnumbered by former occupying Germans who'd surrendered and were relatively tame. Plus there were a fair few Danish collaborators and the Russians almost occupied Denmark.

The liberation officially took effect at 0800 on May 5th 1945. Troops from 1 Para Bde were detached for peacekeeping and occupation duties, following fighting between local Danish and German troops.
 
I’m guessing real colour. There is some nicely pressed kit going on.
To answer a couple of those queries: yes, it is genuine Agfacolor, almost certainly hoarded from the Germans. Most of the 1 Airborne Brigade photos are from the operation to Liberate Copenhagen, although a few clearly show them relaxing later. This one appears to be on or near the drop-zone.


There are also quite a few shots of the main allied ground forces arriving a few days later:

Børge Haaes dias

Willy Nielsens dias
 
Four years ago I went to Copenhagen to visit one of my uncles graves.
He had been shot down over the city, March 1945, and was in a ( thankfully) very small CWG cemetary, about thirty buried there. (Edited number - poor memory)
In one plot was a lad from Parachute Regt and I did wonder what the hell he was doing there.
Now I know !
 
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Her collar ensignia indicates FANY as far as I can tell.
According to the caption on the website she was called Varinka Muus. I just looked her up, she was a prominent member of the Danish resistance and joined SOE after escaping to England in 1944. She died in 2002.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Real colour or colourised? In other words someone's best guess.

Either way, great pics.
Colour film was available by 1945, not common but it did exist
 
Colour film was available by 1945, not common but it did exist
Had been around for a while and used extensively by the Germans in the first years of the war. Their film, known as Agfacolor, was characterised by a blueish tint, especially when faded. Most of the photographs on the Danish site are Agfacolor. The UK/US version was Kodachrome; there were others too.

There is an Irish collector called Ian Spring who has amassed a vast collection of mostly German Agfacolor - here are a couple from his site:

Image result for ian spring russia tanks
Related image

The originals would have been very faded - Ian has re-mastered them. He runs his site, Pixpast, as a business but displays most of his slides to the public, hence the watermark...
 
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FANY AND SOE – 1940-1945
The Special Operations Executive (SOE) was formed from the three existing intelligence organisations in July 1940 on Winston Churchill’s orders to ‘set Europe ablaze’. The purpose was to organise active resistance to the Germans by any means possible, legal or illegal, gentlemanly or otherwise. SOE was divided into various Sections – the most famous being F Section, which took care of operations in France. Others were in Norway, Greece, the Balkans, etc.

One major contribution by the FANY to the work of the SOE was in Communications, in both Signals and Cipher departments, where they received intensive training on Morse code. Many FANYs were posted to Grendon Underwood listening station, waiting to receive messages from the agents, because wireless was the most valuable link between the FANY operators based in the UK and the agents on the ground.

Another major contribution was the FANY agents in the field: they worked mainly in France. Thirty-nine of the 50 women sent into France were FANYs. Women could move around much more freely, because, since over 1.6 million French men had been deported by the Germans into forced labour, male Resistance fighters were dangerously conspicuous. The FANY had to have perfect knowledge of France, very good (though not necessarily perfect) French, and few family ties.

They undertook their initial training at Arisaig (Scotland) in silent killing, weapon handling, fieldcraft, and sabotage; and did parachute jumps at Ringway aerodrome. They also learned how to operate wireless sets, which they would have carried around in their cases, made to look like ordinary leather suitcases.

At Beaulieu, known as the finishing school for secret agents, they learned the arts of espionage, including complex encoding and message sending.

The Conducting Officers for the agents were also FANYs – they took part in the training, and reported on agents’ strengths and weaknesses. They were also the one to give the agent a small token of humanity before their departure into the field, such as a compact, lipstick or perfume – and, of course, their deadly cyanide pill.
Thirty-nine FANYS actually went into the field, of whom 13 were captured and murdered by the Gestapo.

Some of the most famous ones include:
Noor Inayat Khan, who was part of the ill-fated Prosper network which operated around Paris. Noor was eventually the only SOE wireless operator in Paris. She was arrested and under torture said nothing, and twice tried to escape, but was sent to Dachau, where she was shot in September 1944.

Odette Sansom (later Churchill, later Hallowes) was arrested after seven months, and brutally tortured (with a red hot poker on her back, and her toenails pulled out), but somehow she managed to convince the Gestapo she was married to Peter Churchill, another agent with whom she had been arrested, and that he was closely related to Winston Churchill. She was sent to Ravensbrück Concentration Camp, where she was kept in solitary confinement in a room next to the furnaces, and with the heating turned on full blast throughout the summer to try and break her. She survived pneumonia and the war and lived to become one of our most venerated veterans.

Violette Szabo was one of best shots in the Corps and one of the fiercest characters in SOE, and was captured after a major shoot-out, only being taken when she ran out of ammunition. She was shot at Ravensbrueck in January 1945.

Lise de Baissac was part of the Scientist network near Poitou and would cycle around the countryside looking for fields suitable for drop zones, with her radio hidden in pieces up her skirt and in her bra.

Nancy Wake was the most highly decorated woman of the Second World War, known to the Gestapo as the White Mouse – she undertook a bicycle ride several hundred miles to the Pyrenees from Auvergne to get a single radio part back to her Maquis unit, where she single-handedly commanded some 1,500 men.

Violette Szabo, Odette (Churchill) Hallowes and Noor Inayat Khan were all awarded the George Cross, Violette and Noor posthumously.

All those FANYs who lost their lives are commemorated on the FANYs’ own memorial at the FANY church, St Paul’s Knightsbridge
 

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