1917

offog

LE
1917..
Soldier 1: Achoo !
Soldier 2 : You getting the sniffles?
Soldier 1: Its nothing....
Bugger you, I now have to look up who they think patient 0 was now to satisfy my curiosity.

Edited to add - They don't know who, where, or when.
 
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I think he’s just holding it with his forward hand, but it does look anachronistic.
Modern sentiment and prejudice will be rife, at a rough guess.

Not everywhere was Passchendale, but it does look a bit neat for somewhere with entrenchments.
And no defensive wiring schemes.
 
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Bugger you, I now have to look up who they think patient 0 was now to satisfy my curiosity.

Edited to add - They don't know who, where, or when.
Came from the Mid West and brought over to France on US troopships. There was a good dramatised documentary on it late last year. It was a nasty, nasty business.

ETA: 30% of the global population contracted in (there were 2 or 3 outbreaks) and mortality varied. Estimates are coarse but between 3-10% of the population died. Indigenous communities and fighting aged men were very vulnerable; the latter group due to large numbers being in the Forces together (thus easily spread) but also suggests an autoimmune reaction. Most, however, died of pneumonia which today could be treated with antibiotics (still then almost 30 years away). Others haemorrhaged to death, akin to Ebola; indeed the epidemiology is similar, and also though to have jumped species - in Spanish flu, probably from pigs in Midwest America.
 
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Came from the Mid West and brought over to France on US troopships. There was a good dramatised documentary on it late last year. It was a nasty, nasty business.
So not only were they late to the party,they brought the flu? Nice one. :rolleyes:
 
This is from a French film 'A Very Long Engagement'

Just as brutal, and IMHO, more realistic.

Opinions on such matters are inevitably subjective . “ All Quiet On The Western Front “ was made in black and white , really the only option available at the time , and to me as a consequence is more dramatic . Innovative long panning scenes are used … and in some scenes the natural activity in the middle distance is captured well almost as if a documentary … and the final famous scene in which the key player , Paul , is shot by the French sniper is the more dramatic because of what is not seen …



I have never heard of the film “ A Very Long Engagement “ but I shall watch if possible … if my schoolboy French proves adequate .

… finally remember “ All Quiet On The Western Front “ was a sympathetic American film interpretation of the book by Erich Maria Remarque to present to film goers the war as seen from the perspective of ordinary German soldiers ... could have proven a costly financial gamble at the time .
 
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It might, just possibly, be plausible in 1917 when the Germans made a tactical withdrawal to more defensible positions on the Hindenburg line, leaving the Allies to advance over the abandoned, un-shelled farmland.

Or possibly the script-writers don't know their Alberichs from their elbows. We shall soon find out.
I agree, we'd need to understand the screenplay to be certain...

Today's directors and researchers are well capable of reproducing the muddy 1917 battlefields if they want to - most do. Also, uniform details seem to have been painstakingly done to depict the mid-late war Tommy.

To me, the scenes depicted in the trailer do look as if they are taking place in the Somme region after the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg line (abandoned bunkers, patrols in open country) - which would be accurate for Spring 1917 in that area.

Otherwise, I'd agree with other posters that this would be way out for the northern sectors.
 
I agree, we'd need to understand the screenplay to be certain...

Today's directors and researchers are well capable of reproducing the muddy 1917 battlefields if they want to - most do. Also, uniform details seem to have been painstakingly done to depict the mid-late war Tommy.

To me, the scenes depicted in the trailer do look as if they are taking place in the Somme region after the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg line (abandoned bunkers, patrols in open country) - which would be accurate for Spring 1917 in that area.

Otherwise, I'd agree with other posters that this would be way out for the northern sectors.
While some of the trailer looks spectacular, the whole storyline sounds very 21st C revisionist. I'll probably go to see it on the big screen, but I'm already suspecting it may be better for 'at home' viewing so that I can shout and throw things at the screen without inconveniencing others.
 
My Great Grandad always told a story about how his mate Sid (who lived in the same village), gassed him by having mustard gas mixed up with the mud on his boots.
Saw something similar recreated on a Discovery programme. From memory, in a cold environment the Mustard Gas could remain in liquid form. A man could have it on his uniform and not notice. When he entered the relative warmth of a dugout the Mustard would turn to gas.
 
.....

To me, the scenes depicted in the trailer do look as if they are taking place in the Somme region after the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg line (abandoned bunkers, patrols in open country) - which would be accurate for Spring 1917 in that area.
....
According to Wikipedia the film is indeed set during Operation Alberich. Interestingly the story is partly based on one told to director Sam Mendes by his grandfather Alfred who had served on the Western Front.

 
Opinions on such matters are inevitably subjective . “ All Quiet On The Western Front “ was made in black and white , really the only option available at the time , and to me as a consequence is more dramatic . Innovative long panning scenes are used … and in some scenes the natural activity in the middle distance is captured well almost as if a documentary … and the final famous scene in which the key player , Paul , is shot by the French sniper is the more dramatic because of what is not seen …



I have never heard of the film “ A Very Long Engagement “ but I shall watch if possible … if my schoolboy French proves adequate .

… finally remember “ All Quiet On The Western Front “ was a sympathetic American film interpretation of the book by Erich Maria Remarque to present to film goers the war as seen from the perspective of ordinary German soldiers ... could have proven a costly financial gamble at the time .
They also had the advantage of having lots of WW1 veterans to use as extras.
 
A friend was one of the locations managers for this, he showed me some behind the scenes footage, it’s pretty impressive how they filmed it.

He‘s a veteran, lost his arm below the elbow in Iraq and recently completed a veteran‘s film and media course through SSVC.
 
Were MGs ever actually employed like that? Facing the assault head on and being swung to and fro?

ETA italicization. Also obviously LMGs would have been fairly rifle like.
From what I have heard yes mg's were employed in key positions and used to mow down infantry.
They were as I understand hated by the recievers and treated well outside any early Geneva conventions.
 
From what I have heard yes mg's were employed in key positions and used to mow down infantry.
They were as I understand hated by the recievers and treated well outside any early Geneva conventions.
My understanding was that MGs were fired across the front of the trenches rather than "head on". So as advancing infantry you were most in danger from an MG position hundreds of meters to your left or right.
 
Average death count in WW1 was 9000 men per day. In other words in was the equivalent number of fatalities as suffering from three Twin Towers disasters every day. The For four and a quarter years.

In the Great Gandfathers Regimental Dairy, it notes the Battalion casualties leaving the line to go back for a bit of R&R.
Typically 16 KIA, 60 WIA walking out to the 'quiet' rear
 
Average death count in WW1 was 9000 men per day. In other words in was the equivalent number of fatalities as suffering from three Twin Towers disasters every day. The For four and a quarter years.
Casualty levels were not evenly distributed along the front. Some sectors of the Western front could be very 'quiet'. This could be because they were not particularly strategically important in comparison with other sectors (eg in and around Ypres).

They may also have been sectors where neither side was particularly belligerent and an unofficial 'live and let live' attitude pertained. Sectors populated by regiments recruited from, for example, the Saxony area of Germany were known to favour a quiet life. Some British regiments had a similar reputation as was also the case with certain French regiments. Trench mortar teams and the like who set up in such sectors were made to feel very unwelcome as their presence and activity 'upset the balance'.

This, of course, was a state of affairs that was not sanctioned in any way at high command level.
 
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The British suffered disproprtionatly high casualties thanks to the Higher Ups fixation with raiding and ‘dominating’ no mans land. There were no quiet sectors as such in the British lines.
if they weren’t out raiding, they were annoying the Germans by random MG or mortar fire which usually devolved into an artillery dual that killed significant numbers of men for no advantage.

I read one description of a Red Tab visiting a British front line and being infuriated to see a stand down where the British unit had reached an informal understanding with the Germans opposite that they’d stop hostilties each morning for an hour to do all the things needed to make life bearable, cleaning out the filth and latrines, having a bit of a personal clean up, eat breakfast in peace. He got on the phone and ordered an artillery shoot on the Germans that killed a lot of them as they were out in the open. Unsurprisingly, the rather agrieved Germans returned the shells in spades and over the next week, both sides killed hundreds While the lines moved not an inch.
 

ancient

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Saw something similar recreated on a Discovery programme. From memory, in a cold environment the Mustard Gas could remain in liquid form. A man could have it on his uniform and not notice. When he entered the relative warmth of a dugout the Mustard would turn to gas.
I gather that it would also seep into dips and hollows in the earth. Which meant that during a shovel recce there was a reasonable chance of dipping your nads into a pool of mustard gas.
 

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