18th century cooking

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
This is how the large pack originated as there was no room in the previous small pack for the cauldrons and dried, peas.
 
Did soldiers really have access to such foods back then?
Can believe it - yes a stew based around salted beef or pork plus dried vegetables was standard Royal Navy ration.
One of reasons people joined the forces in the 18th century was three meals a day in reasonable quantity.
 
I've had the "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog" book of recipes by Anne C Grossman and Lisa G Thomas, which it's a Gastronomic Companion to the Aubrey/Maturin novels, for many years now. I dip into it from time to time to relive the lower deck and Great Cabin experiences of the early 1800s, but strictly avoid many of the recipes. If you're a fan of O'Brian, it's a must, but don't impose on guests too much with it; they may not be readers themselves.
 
I think he got the meats in the stew and soup the wrong way around.

He should have used the salt pork with the peas and the beef with the vegetables. Salt pork/ham and peas is a dish from Ireland (cabbage and bacon) to Russia.

Forks were rubbish back then! Mashing parboiled spuds with a wooden spoon seems problematic.

I thought at first that the cabbage would not have been available then but it seems to have been cultivated for about a thousand years.

And like a poster above my Irish mother is still cooking similar dishes.
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
From as olde book Ive got... this was daily :eek:



Dont think I could eat a lb of meat or drink a pint of rum!
 
I've had the "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog" book of recipes by Anne C Grossman and Lisa G Thomas, which it's a Gastronomic Companion to the Aubrey/Maturin novels, for many years now. I dip into it from time to time to relive the lower deck and Great Cabin experiences of the early 1800s, but strictly avoid many of the recipes. If you're a fan of O'Brian, it's a must, but don't impose on guests too much with it; they may not be readers themselves.
I've got that book too - mmmmmm Boiled Baby.... and Three-Decker Pie

What receipes did you have in mind with "but strictly avoid many of the recipes." ?
The rat based dishes?
 
From as olde book Ive got... this was daily :eek:



Dont think I could eat a lb of meat or drink a pint of rum!
It's a pint of wine or 1/3 pint of rum. I'd guess at the weight of the meat including bone etc. I wouldn't expect it to be 1 lb of lean meat.

EDIT: It's odd that I can see your photo when I'm replying, but it only shows a red cross when I've actually posted.
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
From as olde book Ive got... this was daily :eek:



Dont think I could eat a lb of meat or drink a pint of rum!
It's a pint of wine or 1/3 pint of rum. I'd guess at the weight of the meat including bone etc. I wouldn't expect it to be 1 lb of lean meat.
I wouldnt want to drink a third of a pint of rum either! It says on the next page that beer was unlimited! No wonder they couldn't hit anything = it was nothing to do with the muskets - they were pissed.

Pretty meagre fair though? No Lasagne?
 
I've got that book too - mmmmmm Boiled Baby.... and Three-Decker Pie

What receipes did you have in mind with "but strictly avoid many of the recipes." ?
The rat based dishes?
Definitely the Midshipman's last resort isn't for me (I tried it on one occasion at camp in the bush, with what were known there as Broom Rats, which were far from human habitation, so were ok), but I'm not keen on puddings and biscuits, so haven't made any of them. 'Boiled shit's right out. Managed quite a few of the meaty things, and actually am a dab hand at Lobscouse (who couldn't be?). Sea-pie, kedgeree, Coooooq au Vin all have their place in a modern kitchen, and my belly. I'm also not allowed too much luscious fat, so have to keep the suet at bay. You?
 
Definitely the Midshipman's last resort isn't for me (I tried it on one occasion at camp in the bush, with what were known there as Broom Rats, which were far from human habitation, so were ok), but I'm not keen on puddings and biscuits, so haven't made any of them. 'Boiled shit's right out. Managed quite a few of the meaty things, and actually am a dab hand at Lobscouse (who couldn't be?). Sea-pie, kedgeree, Coooooq au Vin all have their place in a modern kitchen, and my belly. I'm also not allowed too much luscious fat, so have to keep the suet at bay. You?
Well as I said definitely the Sea Pie - in the form of a three decker pie plus the the Ragoo'd Mutton which was great. Someone else once did the Soused Hog's face but that was a bit too much for me.
Even the lower deck meals - dried peas and pork stew was good
I do like pudding .... and have worked through all the variations of Roly Roly, Boiled/Drowned Baby/, Plum Duff , Figgy Dowdy and so on .

On the subject of that book though - a total mong who had never even seen a picture of a real sailing man o' war drew the cover art...
I mean - a deckhead that will let an 8 foot Giant stand up?
The blokes are all smoking - on a wooden ship that's drenched in tar, around cannon that are loaded?
(there are several other things wrong but I won't go on...

.edited to add bugger - won't load the picture
further edited to add and coming back this morning now it does load!
 
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Blogg

LE
I've had the "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog" book of recipes by Anne C Grossman and Lisa G Thomas, which it's a Gastronomic Companion to the Aubrey/Maturin novels, for many years now. I dip into it from time to time to relive the lower deck and Great Cabin experiences of the early 1800s, but strictly avoid many of the recipes. If you're a fan of O'Brian, it's a must, but don't impose on guests too much with it; they may not be readers themselves.
O'Brian made a lot if things up, although in context and not entirely implausible.

I quite fancied "Millers braised in onion sauce" but that seems to have been invented by him.

I can however believe it could induce a bad case if the Griping Guts.

Strasbourg Pie on the other hand is real.
 
O'Brian made a lot if things up, although in context and not entirely implausible.

I quite fancied "Millers braised in onion sauce" but that seems to have been invented by him.

I can however believe it could induce a bad case if the Griping Guts.

Strasbourg Pie on the other hand is real.
I very much doubt that Patrick O'Brian made any of the foodstuffs up; everything he did was meticulously researched. There are apparently a lot of cookbooks from the period and before (see the preface to the book). The Last of the French Short Bastards has puzzled more than a few members of the two PoB forums I've haunted in the past, but it's likely to be just a bread roll. 'Millers' was actually taken from a quote from elsewhere; can't remember quite where at the moment but I'll get back on it. Warning: question his critics, but never the Master. There's a vast crew of defenders with big guns ready to repel. ...er, mostly in America, granted.
 
I very much doubt that Patrick O'Brian made any of the foodstuffs up; everything he did was meticulously researched. There are apparently a lot of cookbooks from the period and before (see the preface to the book). The Last of the French Short Bastards has puzzled more than a few members of the two PoB forums I've haunted in the past, but it's likely to be just a bread roll. 'Millers' was actually taken from a quote from elsewhere; can't remember quite where at the moment but I'll get back on it. Warning: question his critics, but never the Master. There's a vast crew of defenders with big guns ready to repel. ...er, mostly in America, granted.
Bastard = fr Batard
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batard
 
I wouldnt want to drink a third of a pint of rum either! It says on the next page that beer was unlimited! No wonder they couldn't hit anything = it was nothing to do with the muskets - they were pissed.
Almost certainly a reference to 'small beer' rather than beer as you or I would know it. Small beer would have a very low alcohol content and was often drunk as standard when fresh water was not available or in short supply.
 

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