18 yr old L/Cpl RMP ?

Discussion in 'AGC, RAPTC and SASC' started by hoohaha, Jul 31, 2005.

?
  1. 15-16 years old

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  2. 17-18 yrs old

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  3. 18-20 yrs old

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  4. 21 and above

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  5. mate, i was born in dpm

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  1. I am joining the RMP soon, (whenever they sort out when the next intake is), ive passed rsc, as detailed on a previous thread of mine, and im going into the afco tomorrow to sign the enlistment papers.
    My question is this, with the minimum age for enlistment as RMP at 17 and a half, am I going to be an old knacker in comparison to the others on my course? at 23 I was one of the oldest at RSC and wondering if this is going to be the case at phase 1 and 2?

    anyone got any ideas on average age of enlistment, especially with regards to RMP? Ive been told im past my physical prime of life and I hope im not going to be left behind by all the young uns.......
     
  2. 23 and beyond your prime?!!! Bollocks!!! what a load of bull!!!

    And I wouldn't worry about it as how fit do you have to be to stand directing traffic or sat on your fat monkey arse trying to drop every normal squaddie in the poo to boost your own ego?!

    Why are you joining the ARMY in the first place if all you want to be is a copper? join the Police Force not the Army, the Army is for people who want to be Soldiers not policemen!!! so don't pretend otherwise...
     
  3. i signed up a few days after my 16th birthday i was a junior entry at pirbright!

    looking at the lads who are joining our reg at the moment i would say a large majority of them are under 18. although im not an RMP according to most of the people i have spoken to from various units i would say it was the same case everywhere!

    dont let it get you down though what you may lack in the physical aspect you are sure to make up for in maturity!

    good luck

    blondy :)
     
  4. I looked at civpol, I looked at it and thought , "fcuk that!"

    joining the army to be a soldier as well as a copper, i know of no civilian police force in which you can travel the world, jump out of a plane, blah de blah, im not going to sit here and quote an army recruitment brochure, you lot know a lot more about it than i do.....
     
  5. Yes but as an RMP you don't join up to be a Soldier as well as a copper do you!!! you are about as far from being a soldier as it gets in the Military!
     
  6. Well, ive made my decision and im sticking to it, theres a hell of a lot of anti-RMP blurb on this site but its not going to put me off whatsoever.
    A bit of banter between capbadges is to be expected but some of the out and out slagging off of the RMP seems a bit daft, would you not be up sh*t creek without a proverbial paddle without them?
    At the end of the day, its the same army, all on the same side, lets learn to get along..........

    anyhoo back to my question, anyone know of average intake ages?.........
     
  7. You have GOT TO BE HAVING A LAUGH!!! without them the British Army would manage very very well and it would be a much better environment for all, why on earth do we need a Military Police Force when the duty of policing our own camps has always been done by ourselves! it's called Guard Duty!!! the only thing RMP's are required for during Wartime is for traffic control in the 'REAR WITH THE GEAR', an 18 year old coming out of training with Rank is absolutely ludicrous and is an outright disgrace that they can have the Gall to look down upon privates who have done 5 times as long and are waiting in the normal line of promotion!!! how can you possibly think any normal soldier can take an 18 year old sprog out of the factory lance jack seriously?!!! Join the Met you'll be welcomed so much more and maybe actually 'liked' by those in the same force as you!!!
     
  8. Fair one re the 18 yr olds, which is why i was posting in the first place, but what about when soldiers get kit nicked/ get started on in the pub/ go awol/fight each other etc etc ?
    A community as big as the army surely needs to be policed, cant help but get the feeling you may have had a run in with the RMP at some point redmist?
    As for guard duty/ standing on the gate, surely thats what the MPGS are for, after all, the RMP isnt the RAFP, which is the reason im not joining them lot! pressing, "gate up, gate down" all day long is not my idea of a career :) - bit controversial but there you go!

    doing a job just to be liked is absolute b*ll*cks, if that was the only factor to consider i dont think thered be a RMP atall.........
     
  9. Fair one, but to be honest all of what you have just said is usually dealt with 'in house' you sound like you probably come from an RMP background and Yes you are right! I have had several run ins with monkeys over the years as have the majority of the British Army! during the first few weeks of Gulf War I after having been in theatre for several weeks without one sighting of an RMP the first time we came across them was whilst filling thousands of sandbags at the side of the road when a spotless, gleaming wagon tipped up with the 1st monkeys in theatre, out jumped a full screw and lance jack who tried telling 20 of us to put our shirts and berries on (it was touching 50 degree C!!!) they were soon sent on their way by our own Staffy at the time who was there (shirt and berry off) helping us due to the fact there was a War about to start!!!!! Join the Infantry or a decent Corps where you will gain respect and will actually be part of a worthwhile Army and not some jumped up prick trying to pick everyone up for the slightest thing!!!
     
  10. Go for it if that is what you want to do.

    I transferred from the infantry to RMP as a full screw. Best move I ever made. I do not regret for one minute the time I spent with the infantry, but the time I spent with RMP was just as good, and in some ways better. I am happy to say that it directly led to my current career. That said, there is a lot that could be improved in RMP. However, like everything else that would cost time, money and manpower.

    There is a load of slagging off of RMP on these boards. Such is the nature of the job. Do not expect to be loved by the rest of the army. However, most of those who comment on here have never been RMP and show their lack of knowledge.

    Just like the rest of the army you will only get out of it what you put into it. There are some excellent people in the RMP as well as some complete tossers just like the rest of the army. One of the good things is that you will get a lot of responsibility very early on, and you will be held to account if you screw up, especially if you are stood in front of the panel of a courts martial as you are cross examined by the defence.

    The hardest part of being an RMP NCO is being a LCpl. There you are straight out of training with one bright white chevron on your arm to show the rest of the army that you are the new boy. Remember they all know that you gained your stripe upon passing out of training. If they are NCOs in many cases had to spend a few years doing their job before earning theirs on a cadre (8 weeks in my case).

    In my day about 1/3 of the Corps was made up of direct entry recruits, 1/3 voluntary transfers and the final thirs were from WRAC Pro (now I am showing my age).

    Just remember to treat all the soldiers you come into contact with, with respect. They deserve it, just as much as you do. This can be hard at times - but it is the best policy. The reality is that you will spend more time getting a soldier out of trouble that getting them into it. There will be plenty on these boards who will disagree with that statement. However, when you see the vast amount of paperwork involved, you will understand You will soon see that the old saying that the RMP are there to:

    Give guidance to the misguided, correct the correctable, and incarcerate the incorrigable (or something like that!).

    So good luck in whatever you choose to do.
     
  11. Nah my background is actually completely crab, mum, dad, brother, all crabs, dad now retired but was RAFP, ill be the first in the family to break the mould and go pongo.......

    Didnt really post to get into a bunfight about the RMP, not really my style

    I dont agree however that the whole of the RMP should be judged based on peoples run ins with one jumped up Lance jack or full screw. I intend to get in, keep my head well and truly down during phase 1 and 2 and keep it the fcuk down as long as necessary, im not gonna jump out of the factory, go TADA!!! and start throwing my weight around unnecessarily, that would just be suicide IMHO...
     
  12. It's a pity they haven't all got your way of thinking! Good Luck with whatever you do, and maybe you will break the mould and actually help the average bill oddie instead of finding them guilty until proven innocent, I must admit though, apart from having several items of decent kit taken from me on coming back from Gulf War I by the RMP's which really cheesed me off considering they are probably now in one or two former RMP's houses on display from WHEN THEY WERE THERE! the worst bunch of jumped up ********* I ever came across were snowdrops in Germany, who really are a waste of space!
     
  13. Redmist - I think you're being VERY shortsighted indeed. I fear you've obviously been arrested by the RMP before? Probably on more than one occasion?

    Hoohaha - hi there! Well done on passing the Recruit Selection Centre and on your choice to join the Army. You're right by saying that there is a lot of banter surrounding capbadges and the RMP gets an awful lot shoved their way; "shit in boots" and all that malarky. Please ignore Redmist cos, quite frankly, he's talking absolute rubbish.

    In answer to your question though, you will find that you will probably be one of the eldest but it really doesn't matter. Everyone is treated the same and you will find that the younger lads will look to you for advice and guidance so your time in basic will be more enjoyable.

    Hope that helps?
     
  14. "mate I was born in dpm"

    PML

    Hmmmm, let's think about this.

    If you were one of the oldest at RSC, are you suspecting that those waiting for a squad in RMP, were an RSC intake of mid-twenty year olds, and you were just unfortunate to get lumped in with 'the kids'?

    Sorry mate sarcasm is the lowest form of wit.

    So the sensible answer is. Yes it will be the case in Phases 1 & 2.

    However, perhaps you could influence those kids, during the training, by giving them some examples of what 'real life is like'.

    Admittedly it's nothing like being in the Army, but I have been, and always will be, against people of 17 1/2 joing RMP, because as soon as they're old enough to drink, they have a great deal of responsibility, and power, entrusted to them.

    Which very few can handle appropriately.

    They aren't mature enough to deal with seasoned soldiers out on the beer after a long Op/Tour/Exercise etc and are likely to find that squeaking out 'orders' at dark o'clock, when beer has been partaken in large quantities, they will, at best, be ridiculed, or worse still, find themselves on the end of several stomping feet.



    Why haven't you asked that of your recruiters/instructors?

    Think about it again, add up the number of 17 1/2 year olds in your RSC Squad, multiply that by 17 1/2, add 23 (your age) then devide by the total number in the squad.

    For example, if we say you were in a squad of 20. 19 of whom were 17 1/2, and you at 23.

    19 x 17.5 + 23 = 355.5

    355.5 / 20 = 17.8.

    Furthermore, apart from them being younger than you and you being 'not in the prime of life', there are 2 obvious drawbacks for yourself.

    1. Your typing and perhaps spelling and grammar, appears to be rusty. As these youngsters are just out of school/college, they'll still have the necessary acumen to pass the written tests.

    2. Get off your arse and make sure you run these kids into the ground. Their bones are still soft, yours are harder.
     
  15. OK Why couldn't I see the replies until I'd posted ? :oops: