144 Parachute Medical Squadron

#1
Hi guys,

I'm interested in joining 144 Para Med Sqn and wondered if any of you knew what roles were available within the unit, other than presumable CMT?

Thanks
 
#2
Driver Rad Op's, Nurses, Doctors, Paramedic, ODP's and maybe Chef.

Oh....and try Google (for MOD/Army Web pages). More accurate info through there than on here.
 
#3
I used to know this unit many years ago when they were 144 PFA based at DoY's in Kings Rd......A good bunch of lads capable of delivering death by stealthy bandage from above. CO was a guy called Dolan, who is probably dead now, or 140 years old.
 
#4
I used to know this unit many years ago when they were 144 PFA based at DoY's in Kings Rd......A good bunch of lads capable of delivering death by stealthy bandage from above. CO was a guy called Dolan, who is probably dead now, or 140 years old.
Think you may mean Daly. Dolan (Doolan?) was the QM.
 
#5
Hi guys,

I'm interested in joining 144 Para Med Sqn and wondered if any of you knew what roles were available within the unit, other than presumable CMT?

Thanks
I left there in Jan.
Clinically they are superb, as RAMC all rounders you will get no better operators than those at 144.
By virtue of being an airborne unit, it tends to attract the more motivated and fit med professionals and non vocational medics.
Being of only squadron strength and dispersed around the country, the drill nights sometimes aren’t the best attended, this is in part too because of the members civvy roles.
With that said, the weekend training and camps are well structured and interesting and there is a wealth of knowledge contained within the ranks!

They will push you towards P Coy, becoming an airborne soldier should be a key motivation for joining the unit! Despite the current restriction on jumping they retain a strong airborne ethos and account for the vast majority of their regular parent units para trained strength.

I hope to go back there once I’ve done my stint attached to the Infantry.
 
#6
I left there in Jan.
Clinically they are superb, as RAMC all rounders you will get no better operators than those at 144.
By virtue of being an airborne unit, it tends to attract the more motivated and fit med professionals and non vocational medics.
Being of only squadron strength and dispersed around the country, the drill nights sometimes aren’t the best attended, this is in part too because of the members civvy roles.
With that said, the weekend training and camps are well structured and interesting and there is a wealth of knowledge contained within the ranks!

They will push you towards P Coy, becoming an airborne soldier should be a key motivation for joining the unit! Despite the current restriction on jumping they retain a strong airborne ethos and account for the vast majority of their regular parent units para trained strength.

I hope to go back there once I’ve done my stint attached to the Infantry.
It sounds great. Thanks for the info. Clearly P Coy would be a huge part of it. Do they train you in your role before sending you to P Coy, or the other way round?

What's the current jumping restriction?
 
#7
Think you may mean Daly. Dolan (Doolan?) was the QM.
He used to live in the Putney area IIRC.

I don't think he married; he kept in touch with a fair few of his former cadets who'd kept in service in one way or another.

Being on his own and in declining years he'd invite a few stabs and ex cadets round to his flat for a very pleasant (stag) dinner.

His gaff was like a Mess ( he'd been there for years and it was jam packed full of memorabilia) and his dog had starred in some telly ads.

The last dinner he hosted saw Peter telling us "We won't meet again" - we all told him not to be so daft - he was right.

A lovely, lovely bloke.
 
#10
He used to live in the Putney area IIRC.

I don't think he married; he kept in touch with a fair few of his former cadets who'd kept in service in one way or another.

Being on his own and in declining years he'd invite a few stabs and ex cadets round to his flat for a very pleasant (stag) dinner.

His gaff was like a Mess ( he'd been there for years and it was jam packed full of memorabilia) and his dog had starred in some telly ads.

The last dinner he hosted saw Peter telling us "We won't meet again" - we all told him not to be so daft - he was right.

A lovely, lovely bloke.
I was a Cadet in Putney, and in my final year or so before in joined the regs (RGJ) I shared my time between my cadet unit and 144. I even went adventure training with them up to Loch Striven in Scotland. I was also fortunate enough to get loaded onto an unarmed combat course with them, which was actually being run by 21 SAS who were, along with 10 Para, co-located with 144. If I hadn't gone reg, I would've almost certainly ended up at either 144 or 10 para....That was all down to Capt Dolan. Good egg.

I seem to remember that one of the cadets I was with from Putney, ended up a C/Sgt at 144. Pete H****y
 
#11
I was a Cadet in Putney, and in my final year or so before in joined the regs (RGJ) I shared my time between my cadet unit and 144. I even went adventure training with them up to Loch Striven in Scotland. I was also fortunate enough to get loaded onto an unarmed combat course with them, which was actually being run by 21 SAS who were, along with 10 Para, co-located with 144. If I hadn't gone reg, I would've almost certainly ended up at either 144 or 10 para....That was all down to Capt Dolan. Good egg.

I seem to remember that one of the cadets I was with from Putney, ended up a C/Sgt at 144. Pete H****y
Pete was a very good friend of mine.
 
#12
I used to know this unit many years ago when they were 144 PFA based at DoY's in Kings Rd......A good bunch of lads capable of delivering death by stealthy bandage from above. CO was a guy called Dolan, who is probably dead now, or 140 years old.
See if you remember any faces here from 1974.
1505_39580417346_9583_n.jpg
 
#13
I left there in Jan.
Clinically they are superb, as RAMC all rounders you will get no better operators than those at 144.
By virtue of being an airborne unit, it tends to attract the more motivated and fit med professionals and non vocational medics.
Being of only squadron strength and dispersed around the country, the drill nights sometimes aren’t the best attended, this is in part too because of the members civvy roles.
With that said, the weekend training and camps are well structured and interesting and there is a wealth of knowledge contained within the ranks!

They will push you towards P Coy, becoming an airborne soldier should be a key motivation for joining the unit! Despite the current restriction on jumping they retain a strong airborne ethos and account for the vast majority of their regular parent units para trained strength.

I hope to go back there once I’ve done my stint attached to the Infantry.
Top post, well said.
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
#15
Met Pete D many times when he helped out with my cadet unit in the mid-late 70s. He set a great example to the young kids, and, as with many other posters above, I went Regular, and completed a full career, including serving with Airborne Forces. When did he pass away?
 
#16
Met Pete D many times when he helped out with my cadet unit in the mid-late 70s. He set a great example to the young kids, and, as with many other posters above, I went Regular, and completed a full career, including serving with Airborne Forces. When did he pass away?
Think it would have been eight to ten years ago. Maybe slightly less.
Cracking bloke.
 
#18
Met Pete D many times when he helped out with my cadet unit in the mid-late 70s. He set a great example to the young kids, and, as with many other posters above, I went Regular, and completed a full career, including serving with Airborne Forces. When did he pass away?
Putney bridge?
 
#20
He used to live in the Putney area IIRC.

I don't think he married; he kept in touch with a fair few of his former cadets who'd kept in service in one way or another.

Being on his own and in declining years he'd invite a few stabs and ex cadets round to his flat for a very pleasant (stag) dinner.

His gaff was like a Mess ( he'd been there for years and it was jam packed full of memorabilia) and his dog had starred in some telly ads.

The last dinner he hosted saw Peter telling us "We won't meet again" - we all told him not to be so daft - he was right.

A lovely, lovely bloke.
Indeed, he was a good guy.
 
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