13 Signal Regiment

D

Deleted 3147

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Keyboard warriors? Cyber warfare
A pithy post, insightful and well considered!

Keyboard warriors:: Probably more useful and appropriate in cyber warfare than Jack and Jill armed with L85A2 wouldn't you say?

If you've taken the time to read the MoD press releases [Google is your friend] you'll see their role in Defensive Cyber Operations.
 

Dread

LE
As this thread was the only one raised by searching "13 Signal Regiment", either that means they're quite good at their job and are hiding themselves...

...or that they're utterly shyte in true R.Sigs tradition, and are still working on dial-up modems at fax speed and haven't found this site yet.

So the Army has 13 Sigs. Taken from one press-blurb:
The primary objective of the new cyber regiment is not only to secure existing digital communication lines but to provide specialist technical support for a hub to test and implement next-generation information capabilities as well. This will ensure that the Armed Forces will enjoy an edge in future cyber operations against enemy states.

You then have the NCF:
Enhancing the UK’s world-leading and responsible cyber power. “The National Cyber Force is a joint Defence and GCHQ capability, giving the UK a world-class ability to conduct cyber operations,” said Defence Secretary Ben Wallace.

“The NCF is bolstering our global presence in the cyber domain, and it is a clear example of how we are turning our ambitious agenda to modernise defence into a reality,” he added.

I use some geeks in a company to write code and get components and systems talking to each other and recording data over several protocols. Because of cost and my location, I use Hungarian programmers. They are also excellent at their job (albeit a trifle 'Rain Man'). A halfway decent coder here in Hungary is GBP 4,000 per month (and living costs and income taxes here are a fraction of the UK). A good software programmer in Hungary can easily pick up double that if they can maintain a vaguely human façade and speak to customers.

So the question is: how shit are 13 Sigs if they are paying people GBP24k (when trained), if on the outside of the fence they could easily be making double this? What would motivate someone to stay (once trained)? Please don't say "Queen and Country" as 99.9999% of soldiers know that's bollöcks and rarely lasts beyond the first locker inspection.

No especial reason for asking.
 
What would motivate someone to stay (once trained)? Please don't say "Queen and Country" as 99.9999% of soldiers know that's bollöcks and rarely lasts beyond the first locker inspection.
I remember reading decades ago that 14 Sigs guys were defecting to GCHQ because it was more money and just as important you just did the job that you were paid for without any of the bullshit R Sigs seemed to be famous for.
 
As this thread was the only one raised by searching "13 Signal Regiment", either that means they're quite good at their job and are hiding themselves...

...or that they're utterly shyte in true R.Sigs tradition, and are still working on dial-up modems at fax speed and haven't found this site yet.

So the Army has 13 Sigs. Taken from one press-blurb:


You then have the NCF:


I use some geeks in a company to write code and get components and systems talking to each other and recording data over several protocols. Because of cost and my location, I use Hungarian programmers. They are also excellent at their job (albeit a trifle 'Rain Man'). A halfway decent coder here in Hungary is GBP 4,000 per month (and living costs and income taxes here are a fraction of the UK). A good software programmer in Hungary can easily pick up double that if they can maintain a vaguely human façade and speak to customers.

So the question is: how shit are 13 Sigs if they are paying people GBP24k (when trained), if on the outside of the fence they could easily be making double this? What would motivate someone to stay (once trained)? Please don't say "Queen and Country" as 99.9999% of soldiers know that's bollöcks and rarely lasts beyond the first locker inspection.

No especial reason for asking.
I suspect that it is a stepping stone - get some training and move on. I brought a chap over to HK last year, ex-Army, went down the route suggested by @par avion and is earning well in excess of £200K in his early 40s. He is, by no means, the exception to rule
 
I suspect that it is a stepping stone - get some training and move on. I brought a chap over to HK last year, ex-Army, went down the route suggested by @par avion and is earning well in excess of £200K in his early 40s. He is, by no means, the exception to rule
I wonder how many would have been happy in the army even with the lower pay, but have just had enough of pointless army f*ckwittery and decide to jump?
 
I wonder how many would have been happy in the army even with the lower pay, but have just had enough of pointless army f*ckwittery and decide to jump?
Good question - with tech types it is often about how engaged they are with the work as much as the salary - although everyone has a price.
 
So the question is: how shit are 13 Sigs if they are paying people GBP24k (when trained), if on the outside of the fence they could easily be making double this? What would motivate someone to stay (once trained)? Please don't say "Queen and Country" as 99.9999% of soldiers know that's bollöcks and rarely lasts beyond the first locker inspection.

No especial reason for asking.
Bit of a crap question really, how shit are they at what?
It's defensive cyber, which will probably be little more than monitoring logs files, when allowed to, which wouldn't pay much in the real world anyway.
 
Bit of a crap question really, how shit are they at what?
It's defensive cyber, which will probably be little more than monitoring logs files, when allowed to, which wouldn't pay much in the real world anyway.
Won't even be that interesting I imagine, security patching, configuration checking (automatic scans), and log long stags sitting in front of banks of monitors while SIEM does it's thing.

However the rest of the time will be fascinating polishing blocks, polishing boots, polishing vehicles and avoiding tedious Regimental Duty types and equally tedious generalist officers who haven't a clue what's going on but make lots of stupid suggestions.

There is a reason it is multi cap badge. :cool:
 
Won't even be that interesting I imagine, security patching, configuration checking (automatic scans), and log long stags sitting in front of banks of monitors while SIEM does it's thing.

However the rest of the time will be fascinating polishing blocks, polishing boots, polishing vehicles and avoiding tedious Regimental Duty types and equally tedious generalist officers who haven't a clue what's going on but make lots of stupid suggestions.

There is a reason it is multi cap badge. :cool:
The reason it's multi-capbadge is so the Arty can send it's pointless IT experts somewhere to be of zero assistance just before they get out.
 
The reason it's multi-capbadge is so the Arty can send it's pointless IT experts somewhere to be of zero assistance just before they get out.
And there was me thinking the majority of R Sigs IT types can spot an Albatross when they see one. so they have had to seek victims from elsewhere
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
It's bad enough that we letter other cabbages share our training budget, but actually let them command a Signal Squadron too...WTAF!!!
Like it matters who commands a Signals unit or subunit, they're just there to justify the PIDs and provide top cover for lovely Adjutant, Ops Officer, RSM and the like posts while the chaps and the Yeo-people and Fore-folk and their LE equivalents get on with the work, despite the best efforts of the DE and RD communities to organise drill and the like.
 
Like it matters who commands a Signals unit or subunit, they're just there to justify the PIDs and provide top cover for lovely Adjutant, Ops Officer, RSM and the like posts while the chaps and the Yeo-people and Fore-folk and their LE equivalents get on with the work, despite the best efforts of the DE and RD communities to organise drill and the like.
R Signals is bad enough at creating noise to fight through but other cabbages have a tendency to try and do things their way which can create a lot more noise. I would say that we do have some absolute masters of ignoring what is actually required whilst insisting on the creation of various spreadsheets and IRTBs that result in nowt. Life is a daily battle at the moment.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
R Signals is bad enough at creating noise to fight through but other cabbages have a tendency to try and do things their way which can create a lot more noise. I would say that we do have some absolute masters of ignoring what is actually required whilst insisting on the creation of various spreadsheets and IRTBs that result in nowt. Life is a daily battle at the moment.

Looking back on what I laughingly describe as my career, in 22 years both in and close to to the Royal Corps, I have to admit that I struggle to remember any particular time when the DE and RD contingent made any positive contribution to operations. Admittedly, I was in a particularly odd line of work and there wasn't - actually - that much potential for these guys to contribute to the mission, but, in general, they were all about CO's cups, red wheel nuts, drill parades and just generally getting in the way.
 
Won't even be that interesting I imagine, security patching, configuration checking (automatic scans), and log long stags sitting in front of banks of monitors while SIEM does it's thing.

However the rest of the time will be fascinating polishing blocks, polishing boots, polishing vehicles and avoiding tedious Regimental Duty types and equally tedious generalist officers who haven't a clue what's going on but make lots of stupid suggestions.

There is a reason it is multi cap badge. :cool:
Hmm - What's the opposite of defensive cyber - I'll let you join the dots.
 

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