13,000 homeless ex-soldiers

Not read the whole thread but I think any government should recognise the trauma of people having served and upstake their pension by 200 or300%. That will do very nicely thank you! Might even help massage the homeless figures.
 
Saw that - council says he was offered two properties already which he turned down and they are looking for something acceptable.

Probably more to the story than the face value headline.
He is one of the single remaining of the 32000 who were on the Princes gate balcony. Too bad that he doesn't have a home after 40 years of future planning.
 
13000 with PTSD? Is this a joke? My dad and his dad also served in the army and after retiring from their services, they led perfectly normal lives. Now, I wouldn't say that money was plenty and there was no hardship, of course there was but instead of getting broken down they started with small jobs and had the determination to make life good once again and they did it.

Nail - Head

How many served in action in WWII? Millions
Numbers 'homeless' on the streets of the UK in 1945-55?

PTSD has become a a huge global industry, mainly thanks to the realisation in the US after the Vietnam War that calling it a condition allowed Drs and trickcyclists to claim vast sums in medical fee's via the VA.

How many of these 'broken heroes' would have been just as broken if they hadn't joined the Army etc?
 
D

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He is one of the single remaining of the 32000 who were on the Princes gate balcony. Too bad that he doesn't have a home after 40 years of future planning.
Shit happens to people...some types of military service has the effect that there is a higher chance of that happening. Clearly nothing has ever gone wrong in your life because you have the empathy of a **** and childish and stupid sense of humour to boot.

I hope things work out for him but I don't think they will...
 

jarrod248

LE
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Nail - Head

How many served in action in WWII? Millions
Numbers 'homeless' on the streets of the UK in 1945-55?

PTSD has become a a huge global industry, mainly thanks to the realisation in the US after the Vietnam War that calling it a condition allowed Drs and trickcyclists to claim vast sums in medical fee's via the VA.

How many of these 'broken heroes' would have been just as broken if they hadn't joined the Army etc?
My Grandad served on the Somme, was in the Army into the 1930’s. My mother and her sisters sat waiting a long time outside pubs for him.
He got arrested a lot, he was on ROP’s a lot, he went AWOL a lot. He shot a Labrador in town with a revolver.
How many back then were just drunks or tramps?
Don’t forget some of these people were shot when they were sick, we are aware of it now, you talk some right tripe.
 
My Grandad served on the Somme, was in the Army into the 1930’s. My mother and her sisters sat waiting a long time outside pubs for him.
He got arrested a lot, he was on ROP’s a lot, he went AWOL a lot. He shot a Labrador in town with a revolver.
How many back then were just drunks or tramps?
Don’t forget some of these people were shot when they were sick, we are aware of it now, you talk some right tripe.

So, they were sick before they 'suffered' this 'PTSD'.

So, how many of these 'abandoned heroes' would have been just as much on the streets if they hadn't been in the Army?

FWIW, my Grandad also served in the trenches in WWI, saw his brother and father KIA in same Regiment. PTSD? No, went home to a happy life and raised a large family.

Into todays breaking news, some people are just going to fail at life.
 
I was talking to three homeless ex soldiers in Colchester on Monday. They were all in their 30's and all were ex RAOC! When they asked for a tip I walked away.
 
Shit happens to people...some types of military service has the effect that there is a higher chance of that happening. Clearly nothing has ever gone wrong in your life because you have the empathy of a **** and childish and stupid sense of humour to boot.

I hope things work out for him but I don't think they will...
That's a bit unfair, for the record I had a tragic event take place 2 weeks as a civvy. I picked myself up to make other plans. I have been in business as has this chap but when that temporarily went downhill in a big way I travelled up country like a Norman Tebbit quote. Lived in the back of a van for 9 months to recoup some revenue ensuring my house. Abraham Maslow is everything to me. I would more than happily put someone up for a bit of work return provided there was a plan in place from the individual. Air, Food, Excrete, Roof over head. I have also done this in the past for a few. If you know the individual please let him be known that help is out there , support is in existence but it has to be initiated by the individual. The quote about the 32,000 on the Princes gate balcony is well known.
 
I was talking to three homeless ex soldiers in Colchester on Monday. They were all in their 30's and all were ex RAOC! When they asked for a tip I walked away.
If they were in their 30s they would have been in infant school the last time the RAOC were around!!!!!!
 
You don't seem to see many homeless ex-sailors knocking about on the streets do you?

There is a reason for that.

We did better at school ;)
 
So, they were sick before they 'suffered' this 'PTSD'.

So, how many of these 'abandoned heroes' would have been just as much on the streets if they hadn't been in the Army?

FWIW, my Grandad also served in the trenches in WWI, saw his brother and father KIA in same Regiment. PTSD? No, went home to a happy life and raised a large family.

Into todays breaking news, some people are just going to fail at life.
Cnut signalling Prick
 
D

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The trope of the distressed veteran cast aside by society is one which has occupied the popular imagination since the Napoleonic wars. However as this (2016) article in Standpoint Magazine suggests it is largely a myth perpetrated by those with a financial interest in getting the public to believe it is true.

The “culture of trauma” clearly exists, and there is no question that some people need help and genuinely suffer, but the epidemic of PTSD that is portrayed on our screens and in our newspapers is widely exaggerated, according to Hugh Milroy, who served 17 years in the RAF and fought in the Gulf War in 1991. He is now CEO of Veterans Aid, a charity looking after street homeless and socially excluded veterans. He has been involved with the charity for 20 years and has a PhD on homeless veterans.

Exaggeration about veterans in crisis from various sources is part of his daily life. One concern is the constant claim that there are thousands of veterans living on the streets. Some media outlets and charities have made wild claims over the years. “I’ve heard shocking numbers like 5,000 to 10,000 homeless heroes living on the streets,” says Milroy. “The internet doesn’t help, as people read these numbers and once said often enough it becomes a truth. Yet the government data indicates that at the moment on any given night, around 3,500 sleep rough in all of England, and around 2 per cent of those might have a military connection.”


That hasn’t stopped some charities and media outlets promoting sad stories that give an impression of “an ocean-going disaster” as Milroy says. He is dismayed watching people exploit the veteran community and public with what is virtual “sadness pornography”.

In fact the biggest danger to service personnel both serving and ex are problems that stem from the culture of alcohol abuse that exists within the forces.

Professor Nicola Fear, Director of the King’s Centre for Military Health Research at King’s College London, is concerned because so much focus is put on PTSD, which is not the most prevalent disorder among service personnel. She thinks it obscures the bigger picture, part of which is the high level of alcohol misuse. While young men drink, young men in the military drink more than their civilian counterparts, and that has nothing to do with combat.

Myth Of Stressed-Out Soldiers On The Street | Standpoint
The trope of the distressed veteran cast aside by society is one which has occupied the popular imagination since the Napoleonic wars. However as this (2016) article in Standpoint Magazine suggests it is largely a myth perpetrated by those with a financial interest in getting the public to believe it is true.

The “culture of trauma” clearly exists, and there is no question that some people need help and genuinely suffer, but the epidemic of PTSD that is portrayed on our screens and in our newspapers is widely exaggerated, according to Hugh Milroy, who served 17 years in the RAF and fought in the Gulf War in 1991. He is now CEO of Veterans Aid, a charity looking after street homeless and socially excluded veterans. He has been involved with the charity for 20 years and has a PhD on homeless veterans.

Exaggeration about veterans in crisis from various sources is part of his daily life. One concern is the constant claim that there are thousands of veterans living on the streets. Some media outlets and charities have made wild claims over the years. “I’ve heard shocking numbers like 5,000 to 10,000 homeless heroes living on the streets,” says Milroy. “The internet doesn’t help, as people read these numbers and once said often enough it becomes a truth. Yet the government data indicates that at the moment on any given night, around 3,500 sleep rough in all of England, and around 2 per cent of those might have a military connection.”


That hasn’t stopped some charities and media outlets promoting sad stories that give an impression of “an ocean-going disaster” as Milroy says. He is dismayed watching people exploit the veteran community and public with what is virtual “sadness pornography”.

In fact the biggest danger to service personnel both serving and ex are problems that stem from the culture of alcohol abuse that exists within the forces.

Professor Nicola Fear, Director of the King’s Centre for Military Health Research at King’s College London, is concerned because so much focus is put on PTSD, which is not the most prevalent disorder among service personnel. She thinks it obscures the bigger picture, part of which is the high level of alcohol misuse. While young men drink, young men in the military drink more than their civilian counterparts, and that has nothing to do with combat.

Myth Of Stressed-Out Soldiers On The Street | Standpoint
Homeless Charities | Charity Directory - Charity Choice

There appear to be 211 charities helping the homeless. One would think that if they managed to do their job for say 15 people per charity it would help.

But since charities are a business and an industry....
 
I was talking to three homeless ex soldiers in Colchester on Monday. They were all in their 30's and all were ex RAOC! When they asked for a tip I walked away.
The point I was, unsuccessfully, trying to make was that there are some who claim to be ex soldiers who are trying it on. I usually give ex squaddies down on their luck the price of a pint of Wetherspoons finest BUT reckon that some civvie scrotes have started to cotton on to the public's generosity for ex squaddies.
 

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