12th July 1690 - It was old but it was beautiful.....

Couldn't march today as last nights bonfire melted my flute.
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Re: your flute. As the flames roared around it, did you hear a strange noise?
Yeah, sorry about that, but Mrs Slaw does do a rather unique rendition of The Sash, especially after half a bottle of Smirnoff!
 
If my phone hadn't let me know what is significant about the date I'd have no idea what the point of this thread was
4 years on, and acutely aware of the unpleasant history of Protestant bigotry in parts of this United (?) Kingdom, I'm none the wiser myself.

I'm therefore going to make known my deep contempt for the Orange Order, and all the small-minded ignoramuses who around this time of year light bonfires to intimidate their neighbours, mistakenly kidding themselves on that this uniquely Irish behaviour makes them somehow more British :thumleft:
 
Let us not forget that King Billy's accession to the throne of England - which has mostly been taught to schoolkids (if it has been taught at all in England) as a 'Glorious Revolution' - was a military coup, sponsored by self-interested politicians, landed gentry and soldiers (including John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough)

Then this Dutch geezer (who didn't even speak English, IIRC) sets about creating conditions in Ireland which alienate the indigenous to the point where the place becomes pretty much ungovernable, leading eventually to a Civil War (in which the English Crown came second) and subsequently to 30 years of avoidable violence, occasioned by the total failure of the UK National Government to guarantee equal rights for all (regardless of religion) in the Province.

Party time?

I'll pass,

Thanks for asking
The battle of the Boyne was a most inauspicious occasion of little military significance. More significant events were to occur later at Athlone, Augherim and Limerick where William's army were made up of Dutch, Danes, Swedes, Prussians and French Huguenots plus a few English, Scottish and Ulster regiments. William's main ally was in fact the Pope with whom he had set up the grand European alliance against France.

The 'Boyne' was a small part in William's quest to free Holland from the influence of France, the Irish were mere pawns who suffered further when King James II's 'Patriotic Parliament' in Dublin used the events to cloak their subjugation of Irish lands leaving the common people landless.

As for the Orange Order - founded 105 years after the 'Boyne' at James Sloans inn in Loughgall following the 'battle of the Diamond' - better known as a small skirmish between Catholic workers and the Protestant 'Peep-o-day' Boys and the 'Bleary Boys' from County Down. Due to what Robert Kee has described as the 'knavery' of the Peep-0-Day boys, they were actually prohibited from joining the new 'Orange institution'.
 
4 years on, and acutely aware of the unpleasant history of Protestant bigotry in parts of this United (?) Kingdom, I'm none the wiser myself.

I'm therefore going to make known my deep contempt for the Orange Order, and all the small-minded ignoramuses who around this time of year light bonfires to intimidate their neighbours, mistakenly kidding themselves on that this uniquely Irish behaviour makes them somehow more British :thumleft:
I thought the grouse season started a month early over there.

Are you implying some people, on both sides, aren't normal?
 
William's main ally was in fact the Pope with whom he had set up the grand European alliance against France.
And who, if memory serves, ordered bonfires to be lit in the Vatican to celebrate King Billy’s victory at the Boyne (albeit for political reasons rather than religious ones). Curiously enough, in all my years in the Province I never once saw this interesting detail portrayed in gable-end murals on the Shankill or Newtownards Road.
 
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The battle of the Boyne was a most inauspicious occasion of little military significance. More significant events were to occur later at Athlone, Augherim and Limerick where William's army were made up of Dutch, Danes, Swedes, Prussians and French Huguenots plus a few English, Scottish and Ulster regiments. William's main ally was in fact the Pope with whom he had set up the grand European alliance against France.

The 'Boyne' was a small part in William's quest to free Holland from the influence of France, the Irish were mere pawns who suffered further when King James II's 'Patriotic Parliament' in Dublin used the events to cloak their subjugation of Irish lands leaving the common people landless.

As for the Orange Order - founded 105 years after the 'Boyne' at James Sloans inn in Loughgall following the 'battle of the Diamond' - better known as a small skirmish between Catholic workers and the Protestant 'Peep-o-day' Boys and the 'Bleary Boys' from County Down. Due to what Robert Kee has described as the 'knavery' of the Peep-0-Day boys, they were actually prohibited from joining the new 'Orange institution'.
I had two good windups for a mate of mine coincidentally called Billy.

Yon WoO being sponsored by the pope was one and the other was that he was English, having been born in Berwick when his old man was stationed there.

Both guaranteed to tip him to the edge of violence.

He's a Scot BTW
 
Well since many of my friends are out celebrating this event with a few ales I will join them in a toast to the little gentleman in black velvet.

Slainte.
Oooh, sly!

I’m irresistibly reminded, at this time of year, of one of Harry Graham’s Ruthless Rhymes:

Billy, in one of his nice new sashes
Fell in the fire and was burnt to ashes
Now, although the room grows chilly
I haven’t the heart to poke poor Billy.
 

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