Figures 120mm Machine Gunner, 3 Para, Falkland Islands 1982 by Smeggers

Smeggers

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120mm Machine Gunner, 3 Para, Falkland Islands 1982 by Smeggers.

Modelled by D.J.Parkins (David J Parkins)

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A different figure for a change, moving away from Napoleonics and Trucks, I thought I would complete a model from a conflict I was actually involved in. D.J.Parkins have been on the model scene since 1976, producing model railway accessories; and branching into figures, vehicles, ships and planes from 1990.Within the company they have four ranges of products:

Flightpath - a range of kits, detail sets, weapons sets, ground support equipment, buildings and diorama accessories for the scale aircraft modeller in 1:72nd, 1:48th, 1:32nd and 1:24th scales, with particular accent on RAF and USAF/US Navy subjects. Flightpath includes the 'Gunsmoke' range of highly-detailed 1:32nd scale modern USAF/US Navy detail and weapons sets.

Firing Line - a range of mainly British Army vehicle kits in both 1:76th and 1:35th scales, together with British and US Army figures in 1:35th and a dedicated range of British forces figures, weapons sets and accessories in 120mm/1:15th scale.

Great Little Ships - a range of 1:72nd scale kits and sets devoted to Royal Navy and Allied WW2 small ship subjects - corvettes downwards, with the accent on Coastal Forces vessels.

Modern Motive Power - a range of mainly BR-Period British 'O' Gauge/7mm scale railway locomotive, wagon and Mk.1 coach kits + detail packs, buildings and lineside accessories.

They are also sold stockists for the excellent Dartmoor Military Models range of 1:48th and 1:32nd aviation figures and 1:48th military figures.

The Machine Gunner came in at £43.51 including vat but not postage.
The kit arrives in a very smart little presentation box containing torso and legs, separate arms, head wearing para lid complete with scrim net and foliage, Bergen rucksack, L7A2 GPMG, bipod in two parts, carrying handle and a sheet of PE parts which include a nice little plaque for the model.

My model (hopefully) shows an NCO from 3 Para's machine gun platoon having a brew. I have tried to make his smock and over-trousers look as though they are wet, as we all were for most of the time. A little artistic license has been added with the ground scenery, modelling it from my own recollections. If you look carefully in the ground cover, you may well find some sheep-shit, it seemed to be everywhere!
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I strongly recommend D.J.Parkins to forum members, whatever your chosen genre, they will have something for you. Their prices are pretty reasonable too.

Smeggers out.
 

Helm

MIA
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You've really done a good job on that mate, coming on in leaps and bounds, only minor thing I'd say he's about to lose his brew unless it's the photo giving it a bad angle
 

Smeggers

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You've really done a good job on that mate, coming on in leaps and bounds, only minor thing I'd say he's about to lose his brew unless it's the photo giving it a bad angle
Thanks mate, that means a lot from you. The back-story to the brew is, he's drunk most of it and is scooshing it about to absorb all of the sugar. Well that's my story any way.
 

Dwarf

LE
I like it a lot. Better than I would have done.

Slight, very minor criticism, perhaps the Bergen should be leaning a bit more onto his shoulders.

I like the touch with the brew, it captures the essence of the British Squaddy in a way that 'heroic' poses just don't seem to get.

Full marks.
 
I like it a lot. Better than I would have done.

Slight, very minor criticism, perhaps the Bergen should be leaning a bit more onto his shoulders.

I like the touch with the brew, it captures the essence of the British Squaddy in a way that 'heroic' poses just don't seem to get.

Full marks.

Speaking from my experience to keep the bergan tight to the back requires the shoulder straps to be pulled tight, this is fine for tabbing at speed but which becomes uncomfortable after a while and cuts into the arms and shoulders. Wearing it slightly looser eases it and allows the circulation in the arms to restart!

With all the weight pressing down on the bottom of the frame the tendency is for the bergan to tip back.

Obvously this chap has slackened off the shoulder straps while he has his brew ;-)
 

Dwarf

LE
Speaking from my experience to keep the bergan tight to the back requires the shoulder straps to be pulled tight, this is fine for tabbing at speed but which becomes uncomfortable after a while and cuts into the arms and shoulders. Wearing it slightly looser eases it and allows the circulation in the arms to restart!

With all the weight pressing down on the bottom of the frame the tendency is for the bergan to tip back.

Obvously this chap has slackened off the shoulder straps while he has his brew ;-)
I get that, I did the same. Just from memory I felt that a little further forward was how I carried it.
To quote the Royal Family memories may vary.
 
I get that, I did the same. Just from memory I felt that a little further forward was how I carried it.
To quote the Royal Family memories may vary.

I seem to remember some rucksacks that had extra little straps which allowedyou to pull the top in closer to the frame/shoulders.

Not sure if they were military or if I am getting confused with some of my civvy outdoors gear. It's been a fair few years since I put on a rucksack for a wekend of hill walking....
 
It’s nice to see someone on here finish a model.
 

Spacehopper383

War Hero
I like it a lot. Better than I would have done.

Slight, very minor criticism, perhaps the Bergen should be leaning a bit more onto his shoulders.

I like the touch with the brew, it captures the essence of the British Squaddy in a way that 'heroic' poses just don't seem to get.

Full marks.
To me, it looks like he is doing the old shoulder shrug thing to try and get it comfortable again.
 
"120mm machine gunner"? I thought they were 7.62? ;)

Excellent work.
I had to read that twice, bugger carrying those bandoliers.
 

Dwarf

LE
To me, it looks like he is doing the old shoulder shrug thing to try and get it comfortable again.
Could be, but only AFTER he finished his brew. Shame -and a crime- to spill it.


Ed for spelling after posting without glasses
 
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Can't speak for the others I usually have a few on the go at once and do what takes my fancy.

Everyone works at different rates. It took me the best part of 8 month to build and complete two Spads, and that included one I binned three quarters of the way through its build. Unless you work at a Sprocket like pace, I find I lose interest sometimes so put a model down and come back to it several months later.

Apart from the Wokka...................
 

4(T)

LE
Slight, very minor criticism, perhaps the Bergen should be leaning a bit more onto his shoulders.

Its a SAS bergan - they literally lean out from the body. The pack part stretches away from the metal frame, which in turn has centre-mounted strap points that cannot be pulled into the shoulder.

The leverage on shoulders and small of the back normally makes a bloke's head hang forward to compensate. If he is standing upright with a straight back, then it s PTI with a couple of pillows to bulk out the bergan...
 
Everyone works at different rates. It took me the best part of 8 month to build and complete two Spads, and that included one I binned three quarters of the way through its build. Unless you work at a Sprocket like pace, I find I lose interest sometimes so put a model down and come back to it several months later.

Apart from the Wokka...................

Complete? When did you start completing?
 
Minor detail...

The "straps" on the mat are the tapes that are attached to the mat and serve to hold the mat in a rolled up attitude. You're missing the 58 pattern utility straps that hold the mat onto the bergan via the loops on the lid of the bergan (which are closer together than the mat tapes).

At least that's how I recall it.
 
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