10k time

#1
what's a normal time to run this in?

I'm 47 and been running for just under a year, this week did it in 53mins, is this ok? I always run on my own so have no idea how I'm doing
 
#2
53 mins is not a bad time.

mind you, a few weeks ago i went on a 90 min bike ride, then ran 1.5 miles to the start of a 10K route, and then did 10k in under 50mins - I was training for a triathlon though. But usually, before all the training that i have been doing, it takes me about 50 mins.
 
#3
I'm 47 and been running for just under a year, this week did it in 53mins, is this ok? I always run on my own so have no idea how I'm doing.
What ever time you acheive if it your best then you should be very pleased with it. Hence PB (Pesonal Best), it is your personal acheivement and no one elses. My 10k PB is 30:54 and while many would say this is a great time, (I'm proud of it) compared to the World Record of 26:17 my time is slow (I'd be lapped 4 times in the Olympic 10,000m!)

Since you have asked the question I presume you would like to improve on it and possibly be competitive aginst similar aged runners. In my experience an athlete compares him/herself aginst other athletes of similar standard, it's natural.. If one fails then it hurts! If one is sucessful then it's great! But failing against someone who is of a much higher standard is damaging so concentrate on your personal progress and mark it against people you know of roughly the same standard. (In other words, if you have a friendly grudge against a neighbour go one better by buying a faster car than his or a better lawn mower, a bigger Christmas tree or something, don't try beating him if he happens to be a 35 minute 10k runner!)

Oh and by the way, for a 47 year old after less than a year of running, acheiving 53 minutes is highly comendable. Aim to make improvements gradually though your major gains will be during the earlier years of your running 'career' (hobby) as your body adapts and gets used to training. Good luck.
 
#4
I managed this year's British 10k (held in London July 2nd) in 51.7 minutes. For me this was pleasing, especially as it was 32 degrees and in an urban area. As Doomandgloom rightly said, it's all about PB and doing your best (progressing each time).

But yeah, if there has to be a rule of thumb with a 10K, a time under one hour is considered to be very worthy and respectable.
 
#5
Worthy and respectable indeed. But what about for army standard specifically officers? I did a 7 mile in an hour and 18 seconds this week. Is this pace sh!t for the army, i know its alright for civvie street as its a 8 and a half minute mile.
 
#6
There isn't an official army requirement for a 10k pace but for comparison a 47 year-old man would be expected to do the 1.5 mile BPFA in 12:30 and a 47 year-old woman in 15:00.
That pace is the same as a little over 52:00 or 62:30 respectively for 10k. Obviously you'd expect to run more slowly when you're going 4 times the distance so it looks like the army would consider you to be pretty good.

See here for the figures
http://www.army.mod.uk/linked_files/tayforth/TA_BPFA_CFT_Guide.pdf
 
#7
bren_gunner said:
Worthy and respectable indeed. But what about for army standard specifically officers? I did a 7 mile in an hour and 18 seconds this week. Is this pace sh!t for the army, i know its alright for civvie street as its a 8 and a half minute mile.
IMHO in the military generally you are not required to run continually for an hour (but the ability to do so is required), tab certainly because distance covered as a squad and with kit is the aim. Age and sex are the factors considered during APFAs not rank. However, as a junior officer you'd be expected to be able to 'lead fom the front' and for this a your present level of fitness is good but should be improved upon if possible. As a staff officer I'm certain you'd be encouraged to eat all the pies you can lay your hands on as fitness becomes a distant memory.... :lol:
 
#8
thanks for the comments/tips everyone

I know I can now comfortably do it in under an hour, next goal is to build up my distance

marathon for my 50th?
 
#9
fairmaidofperth said:
thanks for the comments/tips everyone

I know I can now comfortably do it in under an hour, next goal is to build up my distance

marathon for my 50th?
Marathon? Yes, and why not? I always say that 26 is just a number. I also say that you only hit 'the wall' if you are ill prepared or misjudge your early pace. Idiots seen staggering legless all over the roads at London each year ( :lol: ) are ill prepared and ill disciplined, they don't get my sympathy.

PM me if you'd like a little guidance fairmaidofperth...
 
#11
what's a normal time to run this in?

I'm 47 and been running for just under a year, this week did it in 53mins, is this ok? I always run on my own so have no idea how I'm doing
47? Female? 53 mins? Fcuk yeah, take a like.


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
Just seen the date it was posted. But the like stands anyway.
 
#12
thanks for the comments/tips everyone

I know I can now comfortably do it in under an hour, next goal is to build up my distance

marathon for my 50th?
Start with half marathons (20k) and see how you get on.
 

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
#14
Worthy and respectable indeed. But what about for army standard specifically officers? I did a 7 mile in an hour and 18 seconds this week. Is this pace sh!t for the army, i know its alright for civvie street as its a 8 and a half minute mile.
People get way too hung up on army running. Squaddies aren't athletes, they're just (or should be) quite fit. I'll stick my neck out and say that if you descended on a bn and just went out there and then, most would come in between 40 and 50 minutes. Including the officers who are no fitter than anyone else.
 

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
#15
47? Female? 53 mins? Fcuk yeah, take a like.


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
Just seen the date it was posted. But the like stands anyway.
Well spotted.

I suppose that makes the comment about bn running somewhat redundant as well.
 
#16
Blimey, thread resurrection. I'm still running, last 10k race was 52m08s (aged 54).

Now aged 55 and done 12 marathons, 2 ultras and a coast to coast. So @syledis the knee caps are still working!

Ran Trail Marathon Wales last Saturday. Brutal but I loved it. I wasn't the only arrser there, there was at least one other on the start line.

Older runners just do it slowly.

ps I get a mention in this month's Running Fitness mag in the older runners' article.
 
#17
Blimey, thread resurrection. I'm still running, last 10k race was 52m08s (aged 54).

Now aged 55 and done 12 marathons, 2 ultras and a coast to coast. So @syledis the knee caps are still working!

Ran Trail Marathon Wales last Saturday. Brutal but I loved it. I wasn't the only arrser there, there was at least one other on the start line.

Older runners just do it slowly.

ps I get a mention in this month's Running Fitness mag in the older runners' article.
Och never mind, soon be time for yer bus pass lassie :smile:
 
#18
I did my first marathon aged 47 at the end of last year. The training wasn't without its problems, my knees are shagged but I'm still running. Take it easy and mix your training, even do run-walk-run. Also try the breathing technique where you alternate which foot you you land on when you exhale, three steps breathing in, two out. It takes some getting used to but can prevent repetitive injury of always landing one side on the exhale. There's some physics behind it but landing on the same side of the exhale can cause problems.
 
#19
Re
Blimey, thread resurrection. I'm still running, last 10k race was 52m08s (aged 54).

Now aged 55 and done 12 marathons, 2 ultras and a coast to coast. So @syledis the knee caps are still working!

Ran Trail Marathon Wales last Saturday. Brutal but I loved it. I wasn't the only arrser there, there was at least one other on the start line.

Older runners just do it slowly.

ps I get a mention in this month's Running Fitness mag in the older runners' article.
Respect!

Any tips on ultras - particularly on HTF do you juggle trg/work/domestic life? presumably you have upped the mileage on the weekend - every weekend?

It's on my bucket list of running things to do and I'm sort of psyching myself in for it - poss Thames Path Challenge next year - but thinking about the implications of much more trg and preparation than just for marathons...
 
#20
Fitting training round everything else is a challenge. I would get up at 05h00 to run before going to work, or head out at 21h00 for a 3hr run once the family were fed and homework done. LSRs were at the weekends and gradually built up. My ultras were only 55k so nothing really. Both of them were night runs, starting at midnight, so I had to train at night.

Nutrition is just as important as the running. Find out what works and what doesn't work. Real food is good for trail runs, much more satisfying as you are working harder if there is elevation.

There are several experienced ultra runners here, speak to @jack-daniels, @zaps or @Brotherton Lad.

Go for it, you never know what you can achieve until you try!
 

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