10 Years on Since Dr David Kelly Died.

#1
STEPHEN GLOVER: Ten years ago today, Dr Kelly's body was found. The subsequent cover-up is one of the great scandals of our age | Mail Online


Did the Blair Government 'sex up' the Iraqi war dossier?

Did Dr Kelly spill the beans to a Journo that the war dossier made 'exaggerated claims'?

An inquest did open into Dr Kelly’s death, on July 21, 2003. But three weeks later, the then Lord Chancellor, Lord Falconer, ordered it to be adjourned indefinitely.
This is the same Lord Falconer who, so Lord Hutton has just confirmed, telephoned the judge only three hours after the discovery of Dr Kelly’s body to ask him to chair an inquiry into the scientist’s death.



And it is the same Lord Falconer who that same morning of July 18 had two telephone conversations with his former flatmate, patron and friend, Tony Blair, who was on an aeroplane from Washington to Tokyo.



Lord Falconer correctly believed he had identified a tame judge friendly to the Establishment. In due course, Lord Hutton returned his verdict of suicide, absolved the Government of any responsibility for Dr Kelly’s death, and declared that Mr Blair, and his sidekick Alastair Campbell, had not exaggerated the case for war.
How many who frequent this forum and with the basic NBC training as was handed down in the Cold War years could see the dossier was bollocks from the moment they published it?

Remember it is this one document on which Blair made the case for war and the vote passed in the House of Commons. Granted it had cross party support and it was whipped but should we expect our MP's to have at least a little knowledge on missile technology and the ability of Iraq to strike far off targets, after all they have access to some of the highest paid advisers in the Country..... The Dossier particularly mentioned the Crown bases on Cyprus were in range of Saddam's missiles.

Was Dr Kelly 'silenced'?
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#3
You cannot hang them. I have dreamt for ten years of winning the lottery to be a part of the firing squad.
 
#4
Kelly should have been jailed straightaway, you break the Official Secrets Act you go to Prison, unless your a Politician "leaking it" or whistleblower, a crime is a crime.
 
#5
Kelly should have been jailed straightaway, you break the Official Secrets Act you go to Prison, unless your a Politician "leaking it" or whistleblower, a crime is a crime.
Kelly was trying to prevent politicians starting an illegal and disastrous war. He failed and it cost him his sanity and his life, but he was a good and courageous man, and he was both right and in the right.

I take my hat off to him.
 
#7
You cannot hang them. I have dreamt for ten years of winning the lottery to be a part of the firing squad.
Firing Squad ? You soft bastard...;-) proper old fashioned hang, draw and quarter. Done right it's hours of pain, squealing and thrashing around. And you can make one watch whilst you do the other ;-)
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#8
The OSA was never meant to be, although used by all governments as, a means of hiding things the government may be embarrassed by. Dr Kelly IMO was absolutely correct in bringing these issues to light.

We were sent into a totally inappropriate war using information that the PM wanted to remain unchallenged, Dr Kelly ensured that the challenge was made and is still being made.

Dr Kelly was the first UK casualty of that war.
 
#9
And this is why it's bad to force people to take "any job they are offered" children.
 
#10
Kelly should have been jailed straightaway, you break the Official Secrets Act you go to Prison, unless your a Politician "leaking it" or whistleblower, a crime is a crime.
Kelly did not face prosecution, says MoD | Mail Online

Part of the speculation on to why he had taken his own life was because MOD had threatened prosecution along with loss of pension.

They denied it of course but make your own mind up.

"The MoD did not threaten Dr Kelly's pension, nor did it threaten him with action under the Official Secrets Act."Dr Kelly was interviewed twice. On each occasion the interview was conducted by MoD officials from the direct line management and personnel chain."Dr Kelly did not spend time in a Government 'safe house'."We are simply repeating points we have already made because they are relevant to our staff. We have informed Lord Hutton's inquiry."
All this has to be balanced against Dr Kelly, his expertise and his service to the Country over a number of years.

David Kelly (weapons expert) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

He was the authoritative scientific voice on what was going down at the time not some back street chemist from Porton Down trying to stir it up for the Government.

Kelly was born in Rhondda, Wales. He graduated from the University of Leeds with a BSc and subsequently obtained an MSc at the University of Birmingham. In 1971, he received his doctorate in microbiology from Linacre College, Oxford. In 1984, he joined the civil service working at what is now Dstl Porton Down as head of the Defence Microbiology Division. He moved from there to work as an ad hoc advisor to the MoD and the Foreign Office.
In 1989, Kelly was involved in investigations into the Soviet violations of the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention and was a key member of the inspection team visiting the former USSR on several occasions between 1991 and 1994. His experience with biological weapons at Porton Down led to his selection as a United Nations weapons inspector in Iraq following the end of the Gulf War. Kelly's work as a member of the UNSCOM team led him to visit Iraq thirty-seven times, and his success in uncovering Iraq's biological weapons programme led to Rolf Ekéus nominating him for the Nobel Peace Prize.[SUP][6][/SUP] He was made a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George in 1996. Although he was never a member of the intelligence services, the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) regularly sought out his opinion on Iraq and other issues. David Kelly became a member of the Bahá'í Faith around 1999. He was introduced to this faith by Mai Pederson, a US military linguist and intelligence operative
In short if you have a civil servant criticizing Government Intelligence as flawed they do not come any better qualified than Dr Kelly.

A truly inspired man and the way the Authorities treated him was criminal.

In balancing Dr Kelly's action you also have to consider the conversation between Blair and Bush where Blair is alleged to have promised UK military intervention in Iraq. This again was also suspected at the time.

For some strange reason they are supressing the truth coming out to this very day....

Blair-Bush Iraq war transcript may be suppressed | Politics | theguardian.com
 
#12
Look, if you're going to get involved with that level of civil service/government/shady agency dealing you are going to encounter... dubious, wrong and just plain illegal practice. No two ways about it. If you're over 25 you'll probably be able to draw experience from your own life.

Talk to the wrong people about it (which is anyone really) and you'll very likely spend your last hour in the company of some large men, who, should they be feeling well disposed to you and possibly in recognition of your previous service, will take you to somewhere nice and peaceful where you feel comfy, to expire quietly.

Ten years later people will talk about you as a hero or as a traitorous ladies' part. You won't care. You'll be dead.

Currently I hold the same view as the Doctor himself.
 
#13
None of the people invovled in this sad tale come out looking good Blair/campbell the press and the whitehall Mafia all must share some guilt over the death of this man.

While thinking Dr kelly's motives were good he was a bit naive in his dealings with what is a very cynical British Press and this led him to come under pressure from all angles.
 
#15
So you agree that Snowden and Manning were right to do what they did as well ?
I have a curious degree of sympathy for Snowden, which I don't quite understand myself.
I'd happily have seen Manning take a stroll up Harrowdown Hill.
 
#17
#18
So you agree that Snowden and Manning were right to do what they did as well ?
No Dr Kelly.s motives i beleive were good but his actions unwise. While clearly a very clever man he was perhaps not worldly wise.
The bottom line is he signed the OSA so should not have been passing information on

Adversley had he kept quiet he would probaly still be alive today and providing some very damming evidence indeed.
 
#19
Kelly should have been jailed straightaway, you break the Official Secrets Act you go to Prison, unless your a Politician "leaking it" or whistleblower, a crime is a crime.
Well, traditionally you need to have an investigation, establish whether a crime has been committed, decide whether prosecution is in public interest, hold a trial, get a verdict and then go through some sort of sentencing procedure - then maybe jail or not in the case of a highly respected expert telling the truth. All a bit embarrassing though if the government ministers are lying through their teeth.
 
#20
No Dr Kelly.s motives i beleive were good but his actions unwise. While clearly a very clever man he was perhaps not worldly wise.
The bottom line is he signed the OSA so should not have been passing information on

Adversley had he kept quiet he would probaly still be alive today and providing some very damming evidence indeed.
If Dr Kelly had been telling the world about our own CW capability or ability to counter CWs then of course he would have been in breach of the OSA. He was a world renowned expert who regularly briefed the press and external agencies about the capabilities of our enemies - a wholly different kettle of fish! If discussing CW was a breach of the OSA then he would never have been able to do the work he did with the UN and others.
 

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