10 Worst British Aircraft

#2
You might, but look over recent posts in the 'Most Beautiful Aircraft' thread....T
 
#3
Regarding the Defiant, one of the RAF pilots who flew them as a target tug in WW2 commented that a stripped out Defiant, prior to fitting the tug equipment, was a completely different beast and was very manouverable and able to give a Hurricane a run for it's money. Boulton Paul did draw up a ground attack version with one seat, four guns facing forward and bomb racks but the die had been cast, the Defiant was being relegated to second line duties and the attack version died on the drawing board.
 
#5
Watched it on YouTube yesterday; IIRC, the biggest problem with the Sea Vixen was that it had a very high landing speed (mind you, so did the F-8 Crusader).
 
#6
Regarding the Defiant, one of the RAF pilots who flew them as a target tug in WW2 commented that a stripped out Defiant, prior to fitting the tug equipment, was a completely different beast and was very manouverable and able to give a Hurricane a run for it's money. Boulton Paul did draw up a ground attack version with one seat, four guns facing forward and bomb racks but the die had been cast, the Defiant was being relegated to second line duties and the attack version died on the drawing board.
It was supposed to be a single-seat fighter version, ground attack was one of its duties if the 4 cannon version had been selected as opposed to the 12 mg version that was also proposed.

Edit to add a pic of the unarmed mockup
defiantjpg.jpg
 
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#7
Watched it on YouTube yesterday; IIRC, the biggest problem with the Sea Vixen was that it had a very high landing speed (mind you, so did the F-8 Crusader).
It also had limited visibility due to the offset cockpit, and the Observer's cockpit made ejection dangerous.

However - much of the loss rate has to be down to the fact that larger and faster jets were operating from relatively from relatively small decks compared to contemporary American ones or indeed the current Queen Elizabeth Class.
 
#8
It also had limited visibility due to the offset cockpit, and the Observer's cockpit made ejection dangerous.
I understood that the FAW2 had much better ejection systems for the Observer. You're not wrong about flightdeck size, although I suspect it wasn't much of an issue on HMS Eagle (more so on HMS Victorious and definitely in HMS Hermes).
 
#9
I understood that the FAW2 had much better ejection systems for the Observer. You're not wrong about flightdeck size, although I suspect it wasn't much of an issue on HMS Eagle (more so on HMS Victorious and definitely in HMS Hermes).
When 892sqn moved to Leuchars, they painted an outline of Ark Royal on the runway for practice. The Crabs asked why it wasn’t full size...
 
#13
When 892sqn moved to Leuchars, they painted an outline of Ark Royal on the runway for practice. The Crabs asked why it wasn’t full size...
Which is odd given that even by the late 60s, ‘Crab’ aircrew were providing a not insignificant proportion of ‘RN’ F-4 and Bucc crews! :rolleyes:

Regards,
MM
 
#16
#18
Wife's aunt's fiance was killed in a Sea Vixen crash off Malta; first fiance was killed in a Meteor 'Meat box' crash. She then spent the next 40-odd years supporting FAA charities; as a result I have a huge amount of FAA and RN memorabilia which she passed on to me.

It's interesting that the 1950s is seen, somehow, as the Golden Years of the British aerospace industry yet some absolutely dogs were produced, outnumbering the stars such as the Vulcan and (the slightly dubious claim of) the Lightning. "Empire of the Clouds" is a very readable account of how parlous many aspects of the UK aviation industry were - Government intransigence, BOAC's pig-headiness, Victorian industrial relations and work practices, unbelievably primitive engineering and assembly facilities... Empire of the Clouds: When Britain's Aircraft Ruled the World by James Hamilton-Paterson

I know the Beverley has been covered to death. But an aircraft, built in the late 1950s, with fixed undercarriage and radial engines? It was, by all accounts, a reasonable performer but definitely an evolutionary dead-end. What on Earth were the designers - and the Air Staff - thinking/smoking/drinking?
 

Goatman

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#19
Skyvan, close the thread
The Parachute Test Team at AAEE Boscombe Down were still happily using one when I was there in 1995.
Sturdy,high volume - the name says it all.
The aviating Transit.
I don't think it was ever supposed to be pretty. People have acknowledged the squat lines and inflicted some pretty horrible paint jobs.



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#20
It also had limited visibility due to the offset cockpit, and the Observer's cockpit made ejection dangerous.

However - much of the loss rate has to be down to the fact that larger and faster jets were operating from relatively from relatively small decks compared to contemporary American ones or indeed the current Queen Elizabeth Class.

Ark Royal parked up next to an American carrier in Norfolk Naval Base

 

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