Builds 1/72 Kriegsmarine WW2 German S Boat with Eduard PE set.

As promised I dug out my old S-Boat from the shed, after evicting a few spiders managed to give it a look over. Sadly it hasn't faired too well, very dusty & dirty, some parts broken off, but I give it a quick brush up with a paint brush & stuck some bits back on with blutack just to give an impression of how it should look.View attachment 634749View attachment 634750

Quick brush up to remove years of dust & dirt & here she isView attachment 634751View attachment 634752View attachment 634753

Triple rudder, twin props missing?
View attachment 634754
Torpedo tubes I made from cigar tubes, plasti card, filler & plastic extrusions
View attachment 634755
Flak gun was kit bought, gun deck in balsa, flag pennant bought, bollards too & the smoke generators scratched my plastic 30ml syringes
View attachment 634756View attachment 634757View attachment 634758

Deck comes off for access to battery compartment, radio gear, motors, prop shafts missing.View attachment 634759

Found this usefull referance book.View attachment 634760View attachment 634761
I also find this, a Zulu fishing boat my Dad started for a family member 2015, I took over after he died, lossed interest & should really get round to finishing, its a display model only.
Sorry for hijacking with a long post, hope you enjoyed it though.
Well I know what @SPROCKET321 is going to say, strip the Sboat back and a rebuild but go to town. :D:D
 
, but there not masterclass, not by a country mile ...
That E boat looks far better than I was expecting, that will shape up great as a display model, with some fine details added, fresh paint job and a glass case, jobs a gooddun, that little Zulu is just great, screaming out to be finished off and put on display in your living room. Thanks for sharing.
 

stuskimac

Old-Salt
That E boat looks far better than I was expecting, that will shape up great as a display model, with some fine details added, fresh paint job and a glass case, jobs a gooddun, that little Zulu is just great, screaming out to be finished off and put on display in your living room. Thanks for sharing.
The E-boat is pretty big, about 3ft long, I'd love to fix it up & disply it on the landing window sill, but Mrs has swiftly vetoed that idea! shame it reminds me of my Dad. The Zulu is for a family member, but I've fallen out with them & partly the reason I haven't finished it, but I really should finish it.
I also have a scratch built 1/35th US Navy Vietnam monitor that I R/C & sailed, buried in the shed that I should dig out, one for @Rodney2q !
 
Nice work!

I wasn't aware of the sriped bow deck section. I've got one of these models in the cupboard so watching with interest.

The Italian navy used the same red/white stripes on their ships for air recognition purposes.

Like most maritime powers, Regia Marina did not pay much attention to the concealment coloring of warships during the inter-war period. Until World War II, Italian ships were painted according to the standard adopted back in 1929.

With the outbreak of the war, the picture changed. After Italian aircraft mistakenly bombed their own ships in the Battle of Calabria of July 1940, identification marks were introduced. To simplify identification of allied warships from the air, alternating red and white stripes were applied on the tank or quarterdeck of all the ships. The upper surfaces of ship-borne seaplanes were painted in a similar manner.

The identification zone on destroyers and torpedo boats was spread up to the fore-end breakwater, while on larger ships it spread only until the fore-end turret. Littorio-class battleships were the only exception, with each of such type of battleship having their own special features. Littorio and Vittorio Veneto had identification strips that ended before reaching the fore-end turret. Besides this, Vittorio Veneto's wooden quarterdeck had lead-grey coloring with diagonal strips. Littorio received also this coloring on her stern much later—at the end of 1941. Battleship Roma's identification coloring at the bow reached the second breakwater, while her aft was not painted at all. The identification stripes of Littorio and Vittorio Veneto were painted over in early 1943, unlike those of Roma, which remained on the ship until she was sunk.
 
I also have a scratch built 1/35th US Navy Vietnam monitor that I R/C & sailed, buried in the shed that I should dig out, one for @Rodney2q !
My 1/144 monitors are rising towards the top of the jobs to finish pile again! They're not the most exciting models for me so I'm just doing a bit here and there between other projects.
 
Mrs has swiftly vetoed that idea!
@Rodney2q !
I can kind of see where she's coming from, wouldn't want to upset the fine balance of domestic harmony, it being in a glass case might change things, all she can see is a dust trap that she imagines will be her job to dust, and her blame when bits fly off. I'd go ahead and do it but have a local museum, charity shop (if you could bare to see it go) in the frame, when she see's it in a glass case looking rather classy, you never know... that Zulu, do it and toast the original intended receivers with a glass of your favorite tipple.
 
the second very subtle salt technique results, those salt crystals look like huge snowballs, they are tiny of course, hardly visible to the naked eye, but they will brush away.
second stage salt a.png

second stage salt b.png

and the Starboard side too.
second stage salt c starboard side.png
 

stuskimac

Old-Salt
I can kind of see where she's coming from, wouldn't want to upset the fine balance of domestic harmony, it being in a glass case might change things, all she can see is a dust trap that she imagines will be her job to dust, and her blame when bits fly off. I'd go ahead and do it but have a local museum, charity shop (if you could bare to see it go) in the frame, when she see's it in a glass case looking rather classy, you never know... that Zulu, do it and toast the original intended receivers with a glass of your favorite tipple.
No I won't part with the E-boat, it reminds me of my Dad too much, but I like your idea of a glass case, definately worth thinking on.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
The Italian navy used the same red/white stripes on their ships for air recognition purposes.

Like most maritime powers, Regia Marina did not pay much attention to the concealment coloring of warships during the inter-war period. Until World War II, Italian ships were painted according to the standard adopted back in 1929.

With the outbreak of the war, the picture changed. After Italian aircraft mistakenly bombed their own ships in the Battle of Calabria of July 1940, identification marks were introduced. To simplify identification of allied warships from the air, alternating red and white stripes were applied on the tank or quarterdeck of all the ships. The upper surfaces of ship-borne seaplanes were painted in a similar manner.


The identification zone on destroyers and torpedo boats was spread up to the fore-end breakwater, while on larger ships it spread only until the fore-end turret. Littorio-class battleships were the only exception, with each of such type of battleship having their own special features. Littorio and Vittorio Veneto had identification strips that ended before reaching the fore-end turret. Besides this, Vittorio Veneto's wooden quarterdeck had lead-grey coloring with diagonal strips. Littorio received also this coloring on her stern much later—at the end of 1941. Battleship Roma's identification coloring at the bow reached the second breakwater, while her aft was not painted at all. The identification stripes of Littorio and Vittorio Veneto were painted over in early 1943, unlike those of Roma, which remained on the ship until she was sunk.
Post #103.
 
No I won't part with the E-boat, it reminds me of my Dad too much, but I like your idea of a glass case, definately worth thinking on.
Same as Dads model’s, now on permanent display in Lord Kitcheners Memorial Holiday Centre. Still belong to the family and can see them when ever, but I’ve kept one at home.
 
the PE magazines for the forward Flak gun.
forward AA magazines a.png

A Deck mounted Magazine holders, B magazine face bent to shape,

the magazines in the holders ready for paint.
forward AA magazines b.png
 
Bolt ring for the skylight portholes
skylight ring a.png

there are 18 skylights and 18 of these PE rings.
skylight ring d.png

the ring size.
skylight ring b.png

the skylights are enhanced by this little bit of extra detail.
skylight ring e.png
 
the Bridge windscreen will take time to get fitted correctly, I'm anchoring it central, then bonding it down at the edges as it hardens in place, doing it all in one go is a recipe for disaster, getting glue all over the glass.
bridge windscreen.png

the pe hinges and hasps on the midships bins.
bin lids hinges and hasp.png

making a start on the first flak gun.
stern gun basic parts.png

plenty of pe detail there to go on. That'll make that gun look scale.
stern gun basic pe parts.png
 
Neither the kit or the Eduard PE set provides a handrail for this ladder, Sven is in the shot for scale, to show how easy it would be to fall overboard in a heavy swell, I imagine a handrail like ths, but I'll have to do some research to see if these gangways had rails.
missing handrail with Sven.png
 
the flak gun assembled, needs a few tweeks, but when something like that is made its a good idea to leave it to set before the second round of adjustments.
flak gun unpainted b.png

flak gun unpainted c.png
 
flak gun painted b.png


Flak gun, first of three on the boat, painted up in RLM71 Dunkelgrun by Vallejo model air. Can't recommend them enough for airbrush use.

flak gun painted a.png
 

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