Builds 1/72 Kriegsmarine WW2 German S Boat with Eduard PE set.

first result from the first salt technique.
first salt effect green deck b.png

closer view, so far.
first salt effect green deck.png
 
masking up the fore deck, those raised details are causing the tape to bulge.
stripes tape.png

the second red tone.
red brown.png

those areas will need to be touched in to tidy it up a bit.
red stripe faults.png
 
the first pieces of PE, anti slip plates and the weather shield over the stern access hatchway.
first pe parts cpng.png

the AA mount base.
first pe parts b.png

sanding the hatch flat with the Bridge plates
grind out forward view ports. d.png

drilled then cut and filed
grind out forward view ports.png

grind out forward view ports. bpng.png

pe plated over
bridge shell.png

view from the Bow of the Bridge shell
 
the re instructions have that brass door to the left of the Bridge replacing a wall mounted box, the instruments film and facia parts will go in after primer paint.
helm pe.png

the roof behind the Bridge fitted
roof behind helm fitted.jpg

side view of the compartment, pe door handles and rubber life preserver still to fit.
side of helm compantment.png
 
Yes, a light grey seems the obvious choice, light would be minimal at night as the top is open to the sky, that brass door probably leads into the enclosed chart room, that could be blacked out the moment the door is open, like a FV432.

THE props and rudders fitted, now I can work topside.
props and rudders a.png

the trial fit of the bridge to the hull shows up gaps that will need pressure to close them.
bridge to hull gap.png

a sprung tweezer closing the gap while it dries.
bridge to hull gap closed.png
 
Yes, a light grey seems the obvious choice, light would be minimal at night as the top is open to the sky, that brass door probably leads into the enclosed chart room, that could be blacked out the moment the door is open, like a FV432.

THE props and rudders fitted, now I can work topside.
View attachment 633778
the trial fit of the bridge to the hull shows up gaps that will need pressure to close them.
View attachment 633779
a sprung tweezer closing the gap while it dries.
View attachment 633780
On the EBoat the Armoured Citadel is the wheel house, I believe the chart room is aft of the bridge.
 
The overhead look to see where I am so far. With the Torpedo tube lids fitted.
torpedo lids fitted a.png

the lids being flat to the ravages of the bow waves would catch hell, they are going to look right with a variation of grey tones with the salt technique to show wear.
torpedo lids fitted c.png
 
There are two torpedos on deck, ready rounds in effect, with two already loaded in the tubes, ready to launch at short notice. So the two on deck can be seen, the PE detail set provides two props per torpedo. Mounted on a length of stretched sprue runner, cut to fit.
torpedo prop c.png

the two pe propellers mounted 1mm apart.
torpedo prop a.png

split lengthways, pegs to hold them together while they dry.
torpedo prop b.png
 
The classic German "Schnell Boat" (hence S-Boat), beautiful design, purposeful & fast, being triple screw it was! I've loved this boat since as a child, the main reason being that my Dad built a balsa 1/32nd scale model from scratch using marine plans. It used to sit on the upstair landing window sill, I walked past it everytime I went up/down the stairs, my Dad did a top job on it, beautifully detailed & would tell my brother & me all about it, what it was etc. He built it mid 70's & said one day he'd put R/C gear in it & sail it, R/C was very expensive back then & out of reach of my Dads budget in those days.
Sadly during the late 80's they had a fire upstairs & it got badly fire damaged, however he managed to save the hull & kept it. Many years later mid 90's when R/C gear became more accessible & finances improved/disposable income for hobbies, he rebuilt it & added R/C gear. He re-did it as a later 43/44 super structure with the enclosed torpedo tubes, armoured cabin & sailed it & I did too! It was fantastic, sailed really well & fast, the hull design was indeed spot-on ! Ran it regular for about 10 years down the local boat lake, it always made me smile watching it & having a go myself! Then it eventually got retired & replaced by other boats, my Dad built & sailed a lot of R/C boats!
One day I went round to see him & he announced he'd had a clear out of old boats, one of which was the S-Boat, put them in pile in the garden, lighter fuel & a match, up she went viking style!
A piece of me died that day, I chuckled with him at the time when he told me, but secretly I was quite sad about it. I think he knew, because he said it was a fitting end to her, she'd already survived one fire, been sailed many times & was worn out.

Well a few years later I picked up a 1/35th scale GRP hull & plans for one, scratch built a 1939 version, fitted R/C gear, twin screw (like my Dads) & got it all working ship shape & bristol fashion & proudly took it down the boating lake. Put it in the water & .........................nothing! dead in the water! lifted it out & put in on the table everything worked, props spun, rudders etc, put it back the water, f@ck all happening! Something was wrong, props stalling, wrong motor size? no idea, never did sus it.
Life stuff got in the way & R/C model boats got shelved & I've not sailed any for a long, long time. My S-boat is still sat in the shed gathering dust, hasn't seen the light of day since atleast 2006. One day, maybe i'll dig it out & have another go, maybe.
Any chance of you digging out the EBoat and putting up some photos of her, any photos of you Dads one ?
 

stuskimac

Old-Salt
Any chance of you digging out the EBoat and putting up some photos of her, any photos of you Dads one ?
I will try & dig it out of the shed sometime & post some piccies, preferably whilst the misses is not around before she starts nagging! It wasn't a highly detailed model, more stand off scale, looks right on the water kind of thing & I know it has sustained a bit of minor damage/ dust & dirt in storage, so it won't be great.
There was some old black & white photo's of my Dads boat when he first built it 60/70's not sure when he actually built it & it looked really good, sadly we no longer have them, lost down the line somewhere.
 
There are two torpedos on deck, ready rounds in effect, with two already loaded in the tubes, ready to launch at short notice. So the two on deck can be seen......
Question. How the hell would they have reloaded those tubes at sea in a small, heaving boat? Surely it would be quicker to dash home, have a cuppa while the shore team did it?
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I've watched weapons being brought onboard, then moved/loaded in the 'Bomb Shop' on a boat. It ain't an easy or quick evolution. Do you know how heavy a torpedo is?!
Oh, I've no doubt. But it looks to me to be how they did it.

Quora gives me this:

"E-boats (which the Germans called S-boats) were significantly larger and had a somewhat different role than American and British MBTs. While they were capable of the torpedo role, they were also gunboats. As another answer points out, they were deliberately bigger and heavier to make them more fitted for sea-going rather than merely coastal operations (since they might have to cross the North Sea). Of course, this also made them steadier torpedo carriers.

Another element of that steadiness was that the tubes were built into the hull, while those on Allied boats were attached to the outside - and eventually weren’t even in tubes. The problem with this is that there isn’t much room for internal tubes even in the larger E-boats - though some of them carried reloads.

The Allies didn’t focus on the gunboat role for their smaller craft until they needed to (because there were no enemy ships to sink, just barges). And when they did, they put everything on the outside because there wasn’t room anywhere else. John F. Kennedy’s PT-59 had two 40mm Bofors and seven twin .50 cals. But all that gear hanging on the outside of the ship makes the crew manning it more vulnerable and the gear easier to knock off or askew. The Americans didn’t mind - they thought packing that much firepower was worth it.

The Germans preferred solidity and reliability to combat power. The same went for their bigger ships, especially in WWI; point for point German battleships and battlecruisers were individually better than their British counterparts. The crews might be less experienced, but their ships were first-rate. The catch was that they had a lot fewer of them.
"

This is interesting:

 
I will try & dig it out of the shed sometime & post some piccies,
That would make a great restoration project, especially as it has such a family connection for you, get it up and we'll all pitch in with help and advice, the combined knowledge of Arsse and all that, it'd look nice in a glass case with some extra detailing. But you may have to clamp down the deck and fix that split in the hull first.
 
Question. How the hell would they have reloaded those tubes at sea in a small, heaving boat? Surely it would be quicker to dash home, have a cuppa while the shore team did it?
Big as the S boats were, the ready to load torpedo would take a while to load, surely, so shoot and scoot, lay off in slack water and reload for the second attack if needed?
 

Latest Threads

Top