1.5 mile run

Pen124

Crow
Hi, I’m 16 years old and currently going through the process of signing up and going to harragote. I then hope to go to para training my 1.5 mile run time at the moment is 9:50 I was just wondering the way way to get this down as I know this time isn’t the most acceptable although I am able to lift max static lift and my pressups and sit ups are in the 65 range thanks.
 
Hi, I’m 16 years old and currently going through the process of signing up and going to harragote. I then hope to go to para training my 1.5 mile run time at the moment is 9:50 I was just wondering the way way to get this down as I know this time isn’t the most acceptable although I am able to lift max static lift and my pressups and sit ups are in the 65 range thanks.
The fitness test changes on the 1st April so l wouldnt worry too much about it.
On the new test, it is a 2k run and you get about a week and a half to complete it.!
 
I was never a natural runner but, actually grew to like running.

Along with doing the mileage, a good pair of trainers, good socks and some pre-planning go a long way to helping you get your times down. Buy, or get your parents, to buy you the best trainers you can possibly afford - I don't mean the latest, blingyest pair all the self appointed cool kids, or some rapper are wearing. I mean trainers for running in, probably Asic's, Mizuno or Saucony. The best socks are probably some Merino wool based runners sock. For pre-planning make sure you drink enough so that you do not get dehydrated. The US Rangers have a saying, "drink today, for tomorrow", you need to drink well in advance of any physical activity and not a few minutes, or an hour before.

When I was working on getting my time down I read up on Fartlek training and adapted it to my need's. I used to go out and gently run a couple of miles to get everything moving and warmed up. Then I had a dual carriageway for a couple of miles with lamposts about every 100 metres that I ran along. The Fartlek/interval part was to sprint from one lamp post to the next, then jog from that lampost to the next, then sprint again, alternating all the way - eventually I used to sprint for 2 lampost distances then jog for one. It builds your cardio and gets the body used to sprinting and moving faster. Then I used to gently run back the last two miles but, sprint in the last half a mile to impress everyone with my speed and manliness.

I used to do 6 miles a day and every Friday afternoon 10 miles, once a month I would do 16 - 18 miles.

Have a read:

The Lost Art of Fartlek | Runner's World

10 Reasons To Run 10 Miles | Runner's World

These people do good trainers for proper runner, just so you know what you are looking at. I used to wait until the sales were on and then go buy the 100 quid top of the line trainers for half the price. Just because they are last years colour scheme does not mean they are shite.

Shoes : Completer Runner, The North's Premier Running Specialists

Good luck Kiddo.
 
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You are the only bloke who has ever done this, particularly past the female accommodation!
I used to buy beers for people to walk around in slow motion near the WRAC block to make it seem even more impressive.
 

Pen124

Crow
I was never a natural runner but, actually grew to like running.

Along with doing the mileage, a good pair of trainers, good socks and some pre-planning go a long way to helping you get your times down. Buy, or get your parents, to buy you the best trainers you can possibly afford - I don't mean the latest, blingyest pair all the self appointed cool kids, or some rapper are wearing. I mean trainers for running in, probably Asic's, Mizuno or Saucony. The best socks are probably some Merino wool based runners sock. For pre-planning make sure you drink enough so that you do not get dehydrated. The US Rangers have a saying, "drink today, for tomorrow", you need to drink well in advance of any physical activity and not a few minutes, or an hour before.

When I was working on getting my time down I read up on Fartlek training and adapted it to my need's. I used to go out and gently run a couple of miles to get everything moving and warmed up. Then I had a dual carriageway for a couple of miles with lamposts about every 100 metres that I ran along. The Fartlek/interval part was to sprint from one lamp post to the next, then jog from that lampost to the next, then sprint again, alternating all the way - eventually I used to sprint for 2 lampost distances then jog for one. It builds your cardio and gets the body used to sprinting and moving faster. Then I used to gently run back the last two miles but, sprint in the last half a mile to impress everyone with my speed and manliness.

I used to do 6 miles a day and every Friday afternoon 10 miles, once a month I would do 16 - 18 miles.

Have a read:

The Lost Art of Fartlek | Runner's World

10 Reasons To Run 10 Miles | Runner's World

These people do good trainers for proper runner, just so you know what you are looking at. I used to wait until the sales were on and then go buy the 100 quid top of the line trainers for half the price. Just because they are last years colour scheme does not mean they are shite.

Shoes : Completer Runner, The North's Premier Running Specialists

Good luck Kiddo.
Thank you I’ve been doing lots of sprinting and Fartlek type training with also adding in 10k and 15k runs to get used to distances but I deffo will be having a look into that thank you
 

Pen124

Crow
Simplest way to improve your running time is to compete. If you have a mate who can run to a similar standard, race them. You'll both get faster.
Yes I do I have a mate he’s a lot quicker than me I’m starting to catch him though he’s small and built for running where I’m quite heavy as I done loads of weights for rugby and stuff from the age of 13 he’s already in the RLC so when he’s home he comes and helps me I’ve now managed to get a 9min 32 second mile and half with him
 

Pen124

Crow
I was never a natural runner but, actually grew to like running.

Along with doing the mileage, a good pair of trainers, good socks and some pre-planning go a long way to helping you get your times down. Buy, or get your parents, to buy you the best trainers you can possibly afford - I don't mean the latest, blingyest pair all the self appointed cool kids, or some rapper are wearing. I mean trainers for running in, probably Asic's, Mizuno or Saucony. The best socks are probably some Merino wool based runners sock. For pre-planning make sure you drink enough so that you do not get dehydrated. The US Rangers have a saying, "drink today, for tomorrow", you need to drink well in advance of any physical activity and not a few minutes, or an hour before.

When I was working on getting my time down I read up on Fartlek training and adapted it to my need's. I used to go out and gently run a couple of miles to get everything moving and warmed up. Then I had a dual carriageway for a couple of miles with lamposts about every 100 metres that I ran along. The Fartlek/interval part was to sprint from one lamp post to the next, then jog from that lampost to the next, then sprint again, alternating all the way - eventually I used to sprint for 2 lampost distances then jog for one. It builds your cardio and gets the body used to sprinting and moving faster. Then I used to gently run back the last two miles but, sprint in the last half a mile to impress everyone with my speed and manliness.

I used to do 6 miles a day and every Friday afternoon 10 miles, once a month I would do 16 - 18 miles.

Have a read:

The Lost Art of Fartlek | Runner's World

10 Reasons To Run 10 Miles | Runner's World

These people do good trainers for proper runner, just so you know what you are looking at. I used to wait until the sales were on and then go buy the 100 quid top of the line trainers for half the price. Just because they are last years colour scheme does not mean they are shite.

Shoes : Completer Runner, The North's Premier Running Specialists

Good luck Kiddo.
Thank you mate this is helped a lot I know have a good pair of runners and it does make a difference you can tell and I’m doing the fartlek training on this thank you
 

Oyibo

LE
Thank you mate this is helped a lot I know have a good pair of runners and it does make a difference you can tell and I’m doing the fartlek training on this thank you
To reinforce what @Effendi said, interval/Fartlek training. I was always pretty fast when I was in the Army, but that type of training got me down to 7m40s BFTs. Do it for a good hour or two to get maximum benefit.
 
You might want to give the treadmill a go, if you get the chance, just in case you find yourself running a slight incline on a section of the run.

P.S. And don't do what I often did, which was chainsmoke three cigarettes before the run. That almost killed me.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I was never a natural runner but, actually grew to like running.

Along with doing the mileage, a good pair of trainers, good socks and some pre-planning go a long way to helping you get your times down. Buy, or get your parents, to buy you the best trainers you can possibly afford - I don't mean the latest, blingyest pair all the self appointed cool kids, or some rapper are wearing. I mean trainers for running in, probably Asic's, Mizuno or Saucony. The best socks are probably some Merino wool based runners sock. For pre-planning make sure you drink enough so that you do not get dehydrated. The US Rangers have a saying, "drink today, for tomorrow", you need to drink well in advance of any physical activity and not a few minutes, or an hour before.

When I was working on getting my time down I read up on Fartlek training and adapted it to my need's. I used to go out and gently run a couple of miles to get everything moving and warmed up. Then I had a dual carriageway for a couple of miles with lamposts about every 100 metres that I ran along. The Fartlek/interval part was to sprint from one lamp post to the next, then jog from that lampost to the next, then sprint again, alternating all the way - eventually I used to sprint for 2 lampost distances then jog for one. It builds your cardio and gets the body used to sprinting and moving faster. Then I used to gently run back the last two miles but, sprint in the last half a mile to impress everyone with my speed and manliness.

I used to do 6 miles a day and every Friday afternoon 10 miles, once a month I would do 16 - 18 miles.

Have a read:

The Lost Art of Fartlek | Runner's World

10 Reasons To Run 10 Miles | Runner's World

These people do good trainers for proper runner, just so you know what you are looking at. I used to wait until the sales were on and then go buy the 100 quid top of the line trainers for half the price. Just because they are last years colour scheme does not mean they are shite.

Shoes : Completer Runner, The North's Premier Running Specialists

Good luck Kiddo.
These are really good resources.

@Pen124 Having had a similar issue to you for the same reason many years ago, here's what worked for me:

1. If your max speed distance is X, make 1-2 training sessions a week a medium-fast level run at X + 1/2X. So if you training to do 2 miles fast, run 3 miles at a medium-fast pace regularly, 5 miles becomes 7.5 miles, and so on. This helps because it makes your race distance feel short, so you still have something left in the tank during it.

2. Practice 'changing gears'. This is a type of fartlek. Set a 1km route. Break it down into 100m sections, 1-10. In section 1, you start off at your slowest possible pace, barely more than a walk. Section 10, you should be sprinting full out. Step up your pace a little at the start of each section. So: 1 = 2kph, 2 = 4kph, 3 = 6kph, 4 = 8kph, 5 = 10kph etc. Maintain that pace throughout the section, but then step it up again for the next one until you are running flat out for the last section. Then, turn around immediately, do the route again in reverse, from slow to fast again. Do 3 reps total to start. You can do 150m or 200m sections as you get fitter, or do x 4 or x 5 repeats of the circuit. Not only is this a good interval training for your cardio fitness, but it builds in a mental idea of your "gears". You will find it much easier to push yourself in a race, because you will have become mentally accustomed to feeling tired but stepping it up regardless.

3. Do interval sessions (what Effendi listed above). Two others which are very useful for improving short distance speed are hill sprints and Tabata sprints. Hill sprints = as part of a longer run, find a hill, run about 100-200m straight up as fast as possible, jog down slowly, repeat 5-10 times. Tabata sprints are only a 20 minute session but they are very effective at improving your VO2 max (oxygen efficiency at max effort). Sprint, flat out, preferably somewhere flat and clear, for 1 minute. Stop. Stand and recover for 1 minute. Sprint back the same way and aim to hit your starting point. Rest for 1 minute. Do 10 sprints total. Sound easy? If you do it properly (flat out and make the same distance) you will be dying by sprint 6. That applies to anyone (because you are setting the pace with your sprint / distance). A mate who was PF and a sniper did this for the first time some years back, thought it sounded easy, and came back hanging. It's very important you rest for exactly the same time as you sprint. So you can do 30s sprints and 30s rest x 20 if you want (it's actually harder). There is a lot of data behind this session being one of the most effective in producing VO2 max improvements: you can also do it with other sports (I used to use it coaching rowing). This improves your ability to maintain running at speed.

4. Only do your "test" run (e.g. the speed and distance you are trying to achieve) once per fortnight. Any more than that and it's a) useless as your body takes 2 weeks to process improvements, and b) discouraging if it doesn't improve.

5. Make sure you add in at least one "recovery" run a week. This should be timed not distance, and the pace should be trivially easy (i.e. it can just be jogging, you shouldn't be breathing hard at all), but do it for 60-90 minutes. That will help develop your muscular endurance without overtraining your cardio system, and build your low-level endurance which is crucially important for Depot.

6. Record your times. Keep a spreadsheet of all your planned sessions, and add your recorded times afterwards. This is partly organisation (you can see if you are achieving your training plan rather than keeping it all in your head). It also allows you to see when you are improving or when you have hit a plateau (your improvement is flatlining) and need to change something up.
 

Pen124

Crow
I used to do lots of long runs, after a while I found out I could do the shorter ones much quicker.
when you were doing the longer runs what intesnsity where you doing as im now usually doing 4 mile runs in around 35 minutes
 
when you were doing the longer runs what intesnsity where you doing as im now usually doing 4 mile runs in around 35 minutes
I was doing between 6 and 10 miles depending on how much time I had. I always gave it maximum effort, which held up for me, as that is what is expected from you when you enlist.
 

Pen124

Crow
Alright lads been a while but I passed selection git a high A my run time ended up being 7:40 cheers lads for the help start now in September
 
Look after your knees and hips. You'll need them later for crazy stuff like walking to the bog for a piss.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Alright lads been a while but I passed selection git a high A my run time ended up being 7:40 cheers lads for the help start now in September
Strong time, well done on getting it down that far in 5 months, that's not an easy ask. You've set yourself up well there for depot.

Keep doing what you've been doing on your running, it's clearly working. I'd also work in a good amount of all round bodyweight circuits, an even mix of core strength, upper body and big leg muscle groups. 6 weeks focus on that will get you to a good place to start training and make everything you do at depot a lot easier.

Don't forget to taper off for 2 weeks before you turn up at Catterick. Reduce your training to a few slow, gentle runs a week, or cross training activities like cycling. If you go hard over the next 6 weeks, that 2 week break will actually make you fitter because you are more rested.

Smash the phys tests in the first week of training, and you'll make your life a lot easier as the DS see you as a strong recruit from the start.
 

Pen124

Crow
Strong time, well done on getting it down that far in 5 months, that's not an easy ask. You've set yourself up well there for depot.

Keep doing what you've been doing on your running, it's clearly working. I'd also work in a good amount of all round bodyweight circuits, an even mix of core strength, upper body and big leg muscle groups. 6 weeks focus on that will get you to a good place to start training and make everything you do at depot a lot easier.

Don't forget to taper off for 2 weeks before you turn up at Catterick. Reduce your training to a few slow, gentle runs a week, or cross training activities like cycling. If you go hard over the next 6 weeks, that 2 week break will actually make you fitter because you are more rested.

Smash the phys tests in the first week of training, and you'll make your life a lot easier as the DS see you as a strong recruit from the start.
Strong time, well done on getting it down that far in 5 months, that's not an easy ask. You've set yourself up well there for depot.

Keep doing what you've been doing on your running, it's clearly working. I'd also work in a good amount of all round bodyweight circuits, an even mix of core strength, upper body and big leg muscle groups. 6 weeks focus on that will get you to a good place to start training and make everything you do at depot a lot easier.

Don't forget to taper off for 2 weeks before you turn up at Catterick. Reduce your training to a few slow, gentle runs a week, or cross training activities like cycling. If you go hard over the next 6 weeks, that 2 week break will actually make you fitter because you are more rested.

Smash the phys tests in the first week of training, and you'll make your life a lot easier as the DS see you as a strong recruit from the start.
Thanks mate it was hard work git there o just git to put the work in haven’t you, what type of stuff would You think about putting into my circuits obviously press ups and sit ups just wondering what else you think, thanks
 

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