Builds 1/350th scale HMS Dreadnaught by Trumpeter

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Saw this guy exhibiting his work a few years back. Awesome work which has taken him a lifetime

Oh, yes. I looked him up on YouTube a few weeks back. Mad, but the world's a far better place for having such people in it.
 
Saw this guy exhibiting his work a few years back. Awesome work which has taken him a lifetime

He's built the 'RMS Queen Elizabeth'. Who knew it was a carrier as well?
 
View attachment 608234

That lot should keep you busy for a bit. We used to have a navy then….
For my money, the best looking ship there was HMS Tiger, identifiable by only having a mainmast.

R.b63f4f07d600f639781a09c1fe4691e1


Two other oddities in the fleet were HMS Erin and Agincourt.

The Ottoman Navy ordered the Reşadiye - a King George V Class Battleship - in June 1911 (originally named Raşid V) and construction started later that year at Barrow in Furness. Churchill was concerned that these would enter the Imperial German Fleet so had her seized in 1914, as the Turkish crew were about to take her over. She became HMS Erin in Royal Naval service. The second ship was a one-off battleship Rio de Janiero ordered by Brazil in 1911 as part of the South American arms race. Construction on the Tyne was delayed when the global price of rubber collapsed, and the Ottomans bought her in December 1913 at a discount, and renamed the Sultan Osman-ı Evve. She was a unique design, and was - when launched - the most powerful battleship in the world. She became HMS Agincourt in the Royal Navy, and like Erin, had a minor role in the Battle of Jutland (1916). Both had a largely uneventful war and both were broken up in 1922.

This apparent English 'perfidy' still pervades Anglo-Turkish relations today; 5 years ago the Turkish Government raised the issue of compensation for these two vessels, with the MOD.
 
The simplest way to mount the model, on wheel halves from the spares box, painted in with the base, it props the hull high enough from the base without being overly distracting.
disc mounts.jpg
 

tiv

LE
For my money, the best looking ship there was HMS Tiger, identifiable by only having a mainmast.

R.b63f4f07d600f639781a09c1fe4691e1


Two other oddities in the fleet were HMS Erin and Agincourt.

The Ottoman Navy ordered the Reşadiye - a King George V Class Battleship - in June 1911 (originally named Raşid V) and construction started later that year at Barrow in Furness. Churchill was concerned that these would enter the Imperial German Fleet so had her seized in 1914, as the Turkish crew were about to take her over. She became HMS Erin in Royal Naval service. The second ship was a one-off battleship Rio de Janiero ordered by Brazil in 1911 as part of the South American arms race. Construction on the Tyne was delayed when the global price of rubber collapsed, and the Ottomans bought her in December 1913 at a discount, and renamed the Sultan Osman-ı Evve. She was a unique design, and was - when launched - the most powerful battleship in the world. She became HMS Agincourt in the Royal Navy, and like Erin, had a minor role in the Battle of Jutland (1916). Both had a largely uneventful war and both were broken up in 1922.

This apparent English 'perfidy' still pervades Anglo-Turkish relations today; 5 years ago the Turkish Government raised the issue of compensation for these two vessels, with the MOD.
HMS Agincourt was notable in having 14 x 12" guns in 7 centerline turrets said to have been know by the days of the week. The was much speculation of the effect of firing a broadside, some thinking it woukd turn the ship over. In the event all was well but it was apparently an impressive sight, the ship vanishing briefly in a sheet of flame.
 
As fars as sh*t jobs go that has to be worse than crawling into the clogged waste disposal chutes on the tower blocks in Belfast to search for arms caches in hot weather back in the 70s. :-(

As far as latter term life expectancy is concerned you are entirely correct, in the shorter term pissing with the waste chutes of somewhere like the Divis back in the day is a brave man's game....

JB
 

W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
HMS Agincourt was notable in having 14 x 12" guns in 7 centerline turrets said to have been know by the days of the week. The was much speculation of the effect of firing a broadside, some thinking it woukd turn the ship over. In the event all was well but it was apparently an impressive sight, the ship vanishing briefly in a sheet of flame.

Known as HMS A Gin Court. ;-)
 

W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
That looks like a long patient build, my eyes wouldn’t have coped at all.

If anyone’s interested, great book explaining the whole naval race. One thing worth noting purchasing cleaning equipment privately to have a tiptop ship for inspections. The coal dust had a lot to answer for.


A great book - recommended.
 

oldnotbold

War Hero
For my money, the best looking ship there was HMS Tiger, identifiable by only having a mainmast.

R.b63f4f07d600f639781a09c1fe4691e1


Two other oddities in the fleet were HMS Erin and Agincourt.

The Ottoman Navy ordered the Reşadiye - a King George V Class Battleship - in June 1911 (originally named Raşid V) and construction started later that year at Barrow in Furness. Churchill was concerned that these would enter the Imperial German Fleet so had her seized in 1914, as the Turkish crew were about to take her over. She became HMS Erin in Royal Naval service. The second ship was a one-off battleship Rio de Janiero ordered by Brazil in 1911 as part of the South American arms race. Construction on the Tyne was delayed when the global price of rubber collapsed, and the Ottomans bought her in December 1913 at a discount, and renamed the Sultan Osman-ı Evve. She was a unique design, and was - when launched - the most powerful battleship in the world. She became HMS Agincourt in the Royal Navy, and like Erin, had a minor role in the Battle of Jutland (1916). Both had a largely uneventful war and both were broken up in 1922.

This apparent English 'perfidy' still pervades Anglo-Turkish relations today; 5 years ago the Turkish Government raised the issue of compensation for these two vessels, with the MOD.
Not sure if it's true but I remember my history master telling us that the ships built for Turkey had the designs altered lightly to make them less ergonomic, and thus less efficient at loading and firing. Just in case...
 
Not sure if it's true but I remember my history master telling us that the ships built for Turkey had the designs altered lightly to make them less ergonomic, and thus less efficient at loading and firing. Just in case...
One had been ordered and partially built for Brazil, and throughout Turkey was an Ally (until 1909 the RN provided the Ottoman Chief of Navy) and a large contract to run the Ottoman dockyards and arsenal had been awarded Armstrong's.
 
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Here we go again, this time it's a Dreadnaught, the most important step in the evolution of the ironclad Battleship, she was remarkable for her time, nothing else could touch her, and she was British.
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let's have a peek in the box. I've already taped the hull halves together for a comparison shot with HMS Westminster's hull.
View attachment 606066
first step, joining the hull using the strengtheners that tie the hull halves together. Getting the keel to line up longitudinally was key here, it wanted to join out of line making a step. So lots of tightly applied masking tape to hold it while it dried.
View attachment 606068
I like that trumpeter is using "Bulkheads" to help stiffen the hulls
 

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