Builds 1/350th scale HMS Dreadnaught by Trumpeter

As was 'Trimming' the process of crawling into the bunker to level the coal out to ensure ship stability...

Not just in the receiving bunkers. The load that colliers carried to the warships also had to be trimmed, and if was transported part of the way to its final destinations, so did the loads of those ships. The mechanised coal tips at Barry docks had dedicated gangs, a tipper operator and anything up to half a dozen trimmers. As noted it was a bleak job as SW steam coal creates clouds of dust, making silicosis for the trimmers an almost racing certainty.

it the cargo shifted in transit, not just coal but any bulk solid cargo - grain was the other joy to carry. It could easily capsize the ship if the weather was too bad to allow the crew into the holds, or if they were unwilling to go. And an unsealed light in a hold would result in a dust explosion.
 

QRK2

LE
And as anyone who's ever worked around coal with know, the dust gets everywhere.

I remember the state of my grandparents' house after the chimney sweep had been. Even with a screen up, there was a lot of dust.

I recall a cautionary tale about a flashbang being thrown into an old coal cellar (on ex I think), the resulting explosion from the stirred up and ignited coal dust was spectacular.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I recall a cautionary tale about a flashbang being thrown into an old coal cellar (on ex I think), the resulting explosion from the stirred up and ignited coal dust was spectacular.
Any silo - grain silos on farms are a danger but also cement, etc. Even foodstuffs - look out for videos of naked flames near such as custard powder being poured.

It's still a very big concern in shipping, with bulk dry cargoes.
 

QRK2

LE
Any silo - grain silos on farms are a danger but also cement, etc. Even foodstuffs - look out for videos of naked flames near such as custard powder being poured.

It's still a very big concern in shipping, with bulk dry cargoes.

I think Steven Segal starred in that instructional video. As an aside, powders like that are used in a pyrotechnic special effects as they can be easier to control than liquids or gasses.
 
I've started building my Hobby Boss 1:350 HMS Lord Nelson. It's an extremely comprehensive model with loads of PE (which I'm not particularly experienced at using). Like the model in the OP, the coal bunkers don't have PE covers.

I might start my own thread - any advice on using PE would be appreciated

20211003_171021.jpg
20211003_171034.jpg
 
Last edited:

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
I've started building my Hobby Boss 1:350 HMS Lord Nelson.. Am extremely comprehensive model with loads of PE (which I'm not particularly experienced at using). Like the model in the OP, the coal bunkers don't have PE covers.

I..ight start my own thread - any advice on using PE would be appreciated

View attachment 607925View attachment 607926
@SPROCKET321 and @Simmerit are your go to bods for PE
there's a bit of info here too
 
on the subject of PE, here's the ladder gangway that goes over the side, not sure if it's called an entryport as it terminates on deck. A complex three piece PE part. looks great when it's bent to shape though, very scale thickness.
entry port ladder.jpg

a few minor corrections to make on the bow.
bow faults.jpg
 

Boxy

GCM
How the heck do you see such detail, electron microscope?
 
A magnifyer on a stand helps a lot, and a PE bending tool takes me the rest of the way.

The model itself is completed. a few shots of it before I set it aside to dry and harden off everywhere that's been, added or touched in.
model completed e.jpg

model completed d.jpg

while that rests aside, time to start making a base for it.
model completed c.jpg
 
That looks like a long patient build, my eyes wouldn’t have coped at all.

If anyone’s interested, great book explaining the whole naval race. One thing worth noting purchasing cleaning equipment privately to have a tiptop ship for inspections. The coal dust had a lot to answer for.


 
As was 'Trimming' the process of crawling into the bunker to level the coal out to ensure ship stability...

JB

As fars as sh*t jobs go that has to be worse than crawling into the clogged waste disposal chutes on the tower blocks in Belfast to search for arms caches in hot weather back in the 70s. :-(
 
D

Deleted 136127

Guest
View attachment 608234

That lot should keep you busy for a bit. We used to have a navy then….

Saw this guy exhibiting his work a few years back. Awesome work which has taken him a lifetime

 

Latest Threads

Top