Builds 1/12 scale Cowboy Chuck wagon by Model Trailways wood and metal kit

I bought this off an e bay seller from France, it's a little bit of a disappointment, I was expecting a .30 30 winchester, but I got a Carbine, probably chambered for .38 Special or some other pistol cartridge, great for potting Jack rabbits for the stew, but for defending against marauding Cherokee, a little under par.
carbine a.jpg

comes out as 75mm from Butt plate to Muzzle Crown, it's meant to be 1/12 scale.
Carbine b.jpg

the lever and trigger guard area is very finely reproduced, the overall shapes not too shabby.
 
got to fabricate a couple of flower sacks, and a lot of work needs doing to improve these basic water kegs, hoops made from styrene sheet and the individual wood strakes masked and airbrushed, and the top to make too.
kegs, basic shapes.jpg
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
I bought this off an e bay seller from France, it's a little bit of a disappointment, I was expecting a .30 30 winchester, but I got a Carbine, probably chambered for .38 Special or some other pistol cartridge, great for potting Jack rabbits for the stew, but for defending against marauding Cherokee, a little under par.
View attachment 607682
comes out as 75mm from Butt plate to Muzzle Crown, it's meant to be 1/12 scale.
View attachment 607683
the lever and trigger guard area is very finely reproduced, the overall shapes not too shabby.
Tried looking at Doll's house stuff? 1/12 is very popular there.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
having checked off all the contents with the parts list there is nothing missing, all here, so I don't have to fill in their on line form to get their customer service in action. But I have, I've asked them how much they would charge me for this...
View attachment 602447
a set of wheel rims. I don't have a lazer cutter, but I could cut out anything but these circles accurately. I read in the kit blurb, that the chuck wagon was converted from a ex Army wagon, I want to scratch build a WW1 army supply wagon one day, and these rims would fit the bill. Need to take a trip to the Land warfare hall at IWM Duxford with a tape measure and a notebook and pen.

When you do, I suspect that the original manufacturers will be looking down on you and praying that they got it right!
 
you're right, got this old Hammer gun, made by Britannia, reminds me of my old B Anson, different stock grip shape, I'll have to paint Damascus barrels on it.
britannia shotgun.jpg
 
tyring the wheel c.jpg

going back to the gaskets that form the tires, they are simply cut to length and glued to the rim.
Wheels from this era were hoop tires, welded together by the blacksmith. Heated up in his tire furnace and cooled on the wheel to tighten the wheel together, known as tying the wheel. George Sturt in his 1870's book the wheelwright shop mentions an earlier method of shoeing the wheel, before his time, but some older vehicles came into his shop for maintenance, the shoes or Strakes were lengths of iron heated up and nailed to the rim, the rim was tightened together with a tool called a "samson" a U shaped iron with a length of steel on the ends tightened by bolts to form a vice like press against the spokes to force the fellies hard against one another at the joins. George says he'd never seen a new samson, and the one in his workshop was probably over a hundred years old.

As the strakes couldn't draw the wheel tight together the wheelwrights build greater dish to the wheel by angling the mortice joints for the spokes. when the hoop tire came in the cooling and contracting would force dishing to the shape of the wheel.

By the time of the wild west, Iron hoop tires were old hat and rubber tires were starting to appear. Especially on carriages and horse drawn cab and bus type town vehicles.
tyring the wheel b.jpg
 
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George Sturts drawing of a samson.
samson drawing.jpg
a scale model of a English farm wagon fitted with strakes rather than Tires, this type of vehicle is far older than the vehicles mentioned in George's book.
museum model straked wagon.jpg
 
So it's Impossible to know when the innovation of hoop tires came into being, as many changes of the time, change happened gradually, over years. but as a general rule wagons like the Costenoga praire Schooner of the early American pioneers, of the 1760-1770'swere probably wood axled and staved shoes rather than hoop tires.
Costenoga with oxen.jpg

This Costenoga wagon in the smithsonian, has been beautifully restored, but could not have had hoop tires at the time.
Costenoga museum piece.jpg

whereas wagons at Rourk's Drift of 1879, being a hundred years later and of more modern design, with metal box axles and hoop tires. Not unlike those in the Movie.
wagons Islawanda blood river.jpg
 
So my little old Chuck wagon is far more modern than any of those mentioned above, from 1880- 1890, almost entering the period of the motor drawn vehicles. the first Model T fords rolling off the production line in 1908.
bare base b.jpg
 
To put this all into context of the most loved painting in England, the Haywain by Constable, painted in 1821, so it would have had hoop tires.
the haywain.jpg

the carter has taken the wagon into the village pond to cool the tire and swell the timber of the wheel, this swelling and contracting of the metal hoop tire would return the old wheel to a tight unit once again.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
So my little old Chuck wagon is far more modern than any of those mentioned above, from 1880- 1890, almost entering the period of the motor drawn vehicles. the first Model T fords rolling off the production line in 1908.
View attachment 610584
I think I have seen somewhere a Model T version of your waggon in use on the prairie.
Lot on it here
 
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