Builds 1/12 scale Cowboy Chuck wagon by Model Trailways wood and metal kit

first wheel out of the Jig, very pleased with that.
first built wheel.jpg
 
Pulled a muscle in my right calf on this mornings five k run, that'll set my fitness back to zero, damn it, still, more time for model making while I'm resting it for a week or so.
I realized just in time that the axles are cast white metal, the hubs are spun and are pretty smoothly finished, but those axles need re-shaping with a course sandpaper.
axle prior to shaping.jpg

It would be bad form to find the wheels won't slip on right at the end of the build, much gnashing of da teef, so a trial fit for all the hubs on all the axles, so I'm confident of a universal fit.
axle shaping.jpg
 
Sprocket, you are a demi-god to me, but Westminster is NOT a Type 45!

Hope you got the right kit! :cool:
Demi God, I'll take that, does that mean I get a go on Demi Moore. I bow to your superior seabourne knowledge, so what type of ship is Westminster?
 
SMC called, the Westminster has been dropped off by the customer for the commission build, so I dropped in and picked it up.
box top artwork.jpg

Pat dropped off the Dreadnaught, so it's been a 1/350 ship kinda day today,
box art b.jpg

Quick look in the Dreadnaught before it goes away into the stash
box lid off.jpg
 
I'm going to finish off the second hind wheel as the spokes are half sanded ready for shaping and then fitting, I'd hate to put it away with loose parts sliding about. And it's always easier to pick up on a fresh chapter, so to speak.
second hind wheel.jpg
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
the Type 23 hull is 37cm long, the Dreadnaught much bigger, but it's comparing apples and pears, they fullfill different roles, the Dreadnaughts being made redundant by the Aircraft carrier.
comparison between 23 and dred hulls.jpg
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
the Type 23 hull is 37cm long, the Dreadnaught much bigger, but it's comparing apples and pears, they fullfill different roles, the Dreadnaughts being made redundant by the Aircraft carrier.
View attachment 603095
Loads of fiddly little bits then?
 
I made a mistake, slightest slip can trip you up with a wood kit, the rim is meant to line up with the segment lines on the wheel plan, I've made the spokes fit the fellies out of sync.
fellie line wrong.jpg

ok, it's a small mistake, but it glares at me, here's how they should be, two spokes to a fellie, with the fellie joins spaced equally apart from the spoke joins. Of course I spell it Felllie, how it's pronounced, it's spelt Felloe.
fellie lines correct.jpg

so I'm simply using Mr Surfacer to fill the grooves. sand them down and then re scribe the lines in the right place.
fellie line filled.jpg
 
the hind wheels in grey primer.
hind wheels in grey primer.jpg

starting construction on the fore carriage, this structure rotates against the wagon and holds the front wheels.
first steps on the forecarriage.jpg
 
a slow build day today, lots of tasks to catch up on, in between.

The Hounds, as they would be called on an English Farm Wagon, most English Hounds formed into a square structure, but the Wild West used this steam bent configuration. The two parts are hinged to allow the shaft to rise and fall with the terrain between Horses and wagon.
the hounds.jpg
 
this is the underside of a model of a British Farm Wagon, notice the fore-carriage hounds are in a square structure, The Designs of British wagons and carts were passed down from generation to Generation of wheelwrights. whereas American Wagon builders had far less of a tradition, and could re- think the Horse drawn vehicle needs of the Wild West.
British Forecarriage.jpg
 

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