Builds 007 James Bond 1/24 scale Little Nellie Gyrocopter

Next Model on the go, the Airfix Little Nellie Gyrocopter from the James Bond Movie "You Only Live Twice"


The kit can be made in two versions, the Movie one or, the Army Air Corps version.


the decal options


the kit parts, of their time, but you know, I love old kits. They're a challenge.


stage one and two, reminds me of the movie, the stop go action sequence where Q builds the Gyrocopter with little help from Bond, "oh grow up 007"
 
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Waz

Old-Salt
The autogyro's main rotor isn't powered. There's another behind pushing the aircraft.

The kit looks good fun.
 
cheers Waz, the figure if I use it will need to look more Connery than this, it looks like his mouth is on upside down. It never was the smartest get up Bond ever wore, a polo helmet and nondescript white shirt and trousers, see how I can improve it.
 

Waz

Old-Salt
cheers Waz, the figure if I use it will need to look more Connery than this, it looks like his mouth is on upside down. It never was the smartest get up Bond ever wore, a polo helmet and nondescript white shirt and trousers, see how I can improve it.
He looks like he's got hooves for feet too.
 

daz

LE
I dunno, is an Autogyro and a gyrocopter the same thing?

An autogyro, also known as a gyroplane or gyrocopter, is a type of rotorcraft that uses an unpowered rotor in free autorotation to develop lift. Forward thrust is provided independently, typically by an engine-driven propeller. From Wikki, so yes is the answer ;)
 
The following film on YouTube is part of a documentary about helicopters. However, after 16 seconds you will see five minutes about autogyro's, in particular built by their builder, the late Commander Ken Wallis. Little Nellie features at 3 minutes in. There is only five minutes of relevance in total. The narrator is the late John Peel. Enjoy.

 

Slime

LE
Looking at this clip the cine camera on his helmet is too big

 
An autogyro, also known as a gyroplane or gyrocopter, is a type of rotorcraft that uses an unpowered rotor in free autorotation to develop lift. Forward thrust is provided independently, typically by an engine-driven propeller. From Wikki, so yes is the answer ;)
Agree. Best not push too far forward with the controls otherwise the blades can unload then an unplanned arrival with terra ferma can result.
 
Without wanting to drift too far from the project brief, hopefully it's okay for a slight stretch in case it helps with understanding the advantages, dynamics and limitations.


 
Also not great if the engine stops rough ground ,I saw this happen , quick reaction from the Air Cadet though .

I could be wrong but I suspect fuel starvation, much like that experienced by WW2 pilots prior to fuel injection.

"During the Battle of Britain it was discovered that the Merlin engine would cut out when pursing Me109s in a high speed bunt dive due to fuel starvation in the float controlled carburettor. Initial solutions involved inverting the aircraft into the dive and also the fitting a restrictor in the fuel supply line and a diaphragm known as Miss Shilling’s orifice, named after the female inventor (Beatrice Shilling) based at Farnborough at the Royal Aircraft Establishment. More permanent solutions involved moving the fuel outlet from the bottom of the carburettor to half way up and the use of fuel injection using a Stromberg pressure carburettor and finally an SU injection carburettor."

The Spitfire Society - Technical - Spitfre | The Spitfire Society

The aircraft was flying quite low so there was minimal time for autorotation so the landing was a little faster than it might have been, as I understand it. Happy to be corrected if that is not the case.
 
Without wanting to drift too far from the project brief, hopefully it's okay for a slight stretch in case it helps with understanding the advantages, dynamics and limitations.


Very entertaining and enthusiastic vids! I want one! :D Shame I don't have a PPL :(
 

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