"£2m care service for ex-soldiers" Is it enough?

#1
£2,000,000 between 60,000 ex-soldiers works out at £33.33 each per year. (At current rates, would probably pay for around 1 hours counseling).

While recognising that not all of them will require help, it still seems to be a bit paltry, especially when put alongside the same sum being used to bribe the UDA into complying with it's obligations under the Good Friday agreement.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/7128040.stm


£2m care service for ex-soldiers

More than 60,000 ex-members of the UDR and Royal Irish Regiment are to benefit from a £2m a year service to help them deal with the legacy of the Troubles.

There will also be re-training available for about 2,000 soldiers made redundant earlier this year.

The government promised funding for the care service in a resettlement package after the RIR home service battalions were disbanded in the summer.

Its aim is to help former soldiers adjust to civilian life.

There will be advice on how to qualify for welfare and benevolent support, job training and access to medical care.

The service will be based at Palace Barracks in Holywood, and 12 of its 25 staff will be located at TA centres in Coleraine, Enniskillen and Portadown.

Colonel Mark Campbell, the last commanding officer of the home service battalions, said the service would help acknowledge the debt owed by the community to those who served in the UDR and the Royal Irish.

During the troubles, 271 locally recruited soldiers were murdered, and more than 600 were left physically disabled.
 
#2
The £2m will be spent, I suspect, on running the whole aftercare and welfare service, not to put into the pockets of those deserving help (£33 each would be an insult). Ex-Soldiers requiring help can apply to the Regimental Benevolent fund for financial assistance. I believe that this aftercare service will soon be the envy of whole of the British Army, it is already well established by ex-service and is run FOR ex-service. (No I don't work for them). This £2m commitment is a great step forward and the aftercare service will continue to grow from strength to strength. Good luck to them.

On a slightly different note, Col Mark Campbell is now sitting on a board which also sits an IRA terrorist, see HERE

While I think that this is a rather uncomfortable union to stomach I think it better to have the views of soldiers represented, otherwise its the terrorist, again, that benefits.
 
#3
V30A said:
The £2m will be spent, I suspect, on running the whole aftercare and welfare service, not to put into the pockets of those deserving help (£33 each would be an insult). Ex-Soldiers requiring help can apply to the Regimental Benevolent fund for financial assistance. I believe that this aftercare service will soon be the envy of whole of the British Army, it is already well established by ex-service and is run FOR ex-service. (No I don't work for them). This £2m commitment is a great step forward and the aftercare service will continue to grow from strength to strength. Good luck to them.

On a slightly different note, Col Mark Campbell is now sitting on a board which also sits an IRA terrorist, see HERE

While I think that this is a rather uncomfortable union to stomach I think it better to have the views of soldiers represented, otherwise its the terrorist, again, that benefits.
I realised that is not a payment to each soldier (doh), but I was wondering quite how far it will go in paying for any care required, given the large number of potential claims on these services. It doesn't sound like a lot of money in the context of the numbers who served. However, you seem to be in a better position than me to judge, and if you feel it is adequate, then it must be so. :D
 
#4
More would be better, but £2m I think is adequate, so long as the resources are utilised in the most cost effective way.

The aftercare services website HERE is now up and running and can give fuller details, a brief snap-shot being:

[hr]

Home of the UDR and R IRISH (HS) Aftercare Service this web site has been created in order to assist those who are eligible to contact the organization in order to benefit from the services we have on offer . those eligible comprise former Full Time and Part Time UDR and R IRISH (HS) soldiers and their families.

Our mission is to provide medical, vocational welfare and benevolence support to this community in order to reduce suffering.

[align=center]"Helping our people in need to live their lives"[/align]

[hr]
 
#5
Is this separare from the package previously announced by Derek Twigg? That was also 2m quid and it was to cover mental health and welfare for all ex-service personnel.

In a magnificent piece of television, the Sky News interviewer tore Twiggy a new one:-

Twiggy : 2m pounds is a large amount of money and it demonstrates our commitment to the armed forces.

Sky Guy : The 2m is to cover 2 years so that's a million a year isn't it?

Twiggy : Yes, that's correct.

Sky Guy : And there will be four regional centres, so thats 250 grand per annum each.

Twiggy (Starting to see where this is going) : Err, yes.

Sky Guy : That isn't enough to pay for a single psychiatrist for each centre is it?

Twiggy : Err, err,

Sky Guy : Or in fact even a psychiatric nurse or a counsellor after the centre running costs are paid.

Twiggy : Err, err, .... NHS .... err ... world class ..... investment .... err

Turns out these new welfare centres will be modeled on the new "Cancer Support Centre" opened with much fanfare at my local hospital. A single room (used to be a ward before the cuts) with a couple of plastic chairs and piles of leaflets, mainly provided by charities - oh and don't forget the now ubiquitous, complimentary copy of Gay News when you walk in the door.
 
#6
A_M,

I think Derek Twigg's, poorly handled, announcement is separate from the £2m announced above, as this announcement is specifically for ex Ulster Defence Regiment and ex Royal Irish Regiment (Home Service) personnel.

I didn't see the Sky/Twigg interview but I'm sure it was quite comical, thanks for posting it. Good to see Labour getting their 'spin' ripped apart, we need more interviewers to do this!!!
 
#7
flamingo said:
£2,000,000 between 60,000 ex-soldiers works out at £33.33 each per year. (At current rates, would probably pay for around 1 hours counseling).

While recognising that not all of them will require help, it still seems to be a bit paltry, especially when put alongside the same sum being used to bribe the UDA into complying with it's obligations under the Good Friday agreement.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/7128040.stm


£2m care service for ex-soldiers

More than 60,000 ex-members of the UDR and Royal Irish Regiment are to benefit from a £2m a year service to help them deal with the legacy of the Troubles.

There will also be re-training available for about 2,000 soldiers made redundant earlier this year.

The government promised funding for the care service in a resettlement package after the RIR home service battalions were disbanded in the summer.

Its aim is to help former soldiers adjust to civilian life.

There will be advice on how to qualify for welfare and benevolent support, job training and access to medical care.

The service will be based at Palace Barracks in Holywood, and 12 of its 25 staff will be located at TA centres in Coleraine, Enniskillen and Portadown.

Colonel Mark Campbell, the last commanding officer of the home service battalions, said the service would help acknowledge the debt owed by the community to those who served in the UDR and the Royal Irish.

During the troubles, 271 locally recruited soldiers were murdered, and more than 600 were left physically disabled.
It's a p1ss take, they spent more than that last year on advertising.
 
#8
I read somewhere that this is a 'extension' of what is already on offer to the ruc/psni reserves as is the medical care.
 
#9
Moodybitch said:
It's a p1ss take, they spent more than that last year on advertising.
And then some.

£90 million on one campaign last year to recruit more muslim soldiers

The result? 15 new muslim recruits.

At six million quid each, I hope they manage to live up to the cost of recruiting them.
 

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