• Author:
    Rory Muir
    Who were Wellington's Observing Officers , how were they selected . How did bridging operations work in the early 19th Century? How did reinforcements reach Wellington's regiments? Accounts of the Peninsular War abound, so what does this book add to the genre? Rory Muir and his co-authors have selected some of these specialised areas and made an impressive study of them.

    The book does not claim to be a generalist review of the whole campaign,rather ,it is probably aimed at the reader with some background knowledge and looking to extend their reading. The author is well known for books that include Salamanca and 1812. His co-authors are also previously published and between them they have meticulously cross referenced and indexed their work to help those who wish to go further than the book itself.

    The specialist areas have been divided up by the co-authors allowing them to really dig into their respective subjects, The Order of Battle chapter gives a real feel for how the Army was deployed. There is even a note of how Rank and seniority worked in the Peninsular Army

    Inside Wellington's Army runs to 274 pages plus another 54 (!) of bibliography , acknowledgements and index the book is a good working aid for additional study. Pen & Sword have laid out the book well with lots of sketches and diagrams. Would- be engineers will have a field day with chapter 7. All who read it will be a little closer to understanding how Arthur Wellesley honed a disparate set of regiments into a winning Army and defeated the best Napoleon could throw at him.

    In all a quirky but enjoyable read and well worth purchasing.

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