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Difference between revisions of "English Electric Canberra"

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Brainchild of the eccentric WEW Petter, the English Electric Canberra was the spiritual successor of the De Havilland DH98 Mosquito; a small, fast bomber capable of outrunning contemporary [[fighter]]s.  
 
Brainchild of the eccentric WEW Petter, the English Electric Canberra was the spiritual successor of the De Havilland DH98 Mosquito; a small, fast bomber capable of outrunning contemporary [[fighter]]s.  
  
The premise, of strapping two of the most powerful jets available to the smallest fuselage and wing possible, doesn't sound promising but it produced one of Britain's most successful and long-lived bombers.  Export sales to 16 countries including the [[USAF|septics]] and notching up sales of over 1300,
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The premise, of strapping two of the most powerful jets available to the smallest fuselage and wing possible, doesn't sound promising but it produced one of Britain's most successful and long-lived bombers.  Exported to 16 countries including the [[USAF|septics]], the Canberra notched up sales of over 1300.
  
The last Canberra flight for the RAF was by a PR9 reconnaissance bird in July 2006.
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The last operational use of the RAF's remaining Canberra PR9s was photo recconaissance in support of operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, which probably ended shortly before the last Canberra flight for the RAF which was in July 2006.
  
 
[http://www.bywat.co.uk/canframes.html Further reading]
 
[http://www.bywat.co.uk/canframes.html Further reading]

Revision as of 02:00, 30 April 2008

canberra.jpg
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Brainchild of the eccentric WEW Petter, the English Electric Canberra was the spiritual successor of the De Havilland DH98 Mosquito; a small, fast bomber capable of outrunning contemporary fighters.

The premise, of strapping two of the most powerful jets available to the smallest fuselage and wing possible, doesn't sound promising but it produced one of Britain's most successful and long-lived bombers. Exported to 16 countries including the septics, the Canberra notched up sales of over 1300.

The last operational use of the RAF's remaining Canberra PR9s was photo recconaissance in support of operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, which probably ended shortly before the last Canberra flight for the RAF which was in July 2006.

Further reading

more reading