am i entitle to a pension

Discussion in 'Armed Forces Pension Scheme' started by mikerothwell, Mar 20, 2012.

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  1. mikerothwell
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    mikerothwell

    hi
    I served from march 1964 till september 1973 plus 9 years reserve i have heard so many conflicting thoughts i am confused and dont know if i should apply for it or not.
     
  2. BIPOLAR77
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    BIPOLAR77 LE

    0800 0853600
     
  3. Biscuits_AB
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    Biscuits_AB

  4. EScotia
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    EScotia LE Book Reviewer

    Army pensions only started in 1975 so, unfortunately, I doubt it.
     
  5. Fallschirmjager
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    Fallschirmjager LE

  6. sandmanfez
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    sandmanfez LE

    Wasn't the SLR a piece of shite.
     
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  7. sunami
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    sunami LE

    Prior to 1975 there were no rights to preserved pensions in any public or private pension schemes. Most schemes had very restricted qualifying criteria for the award of pensions. For instance, to qualify for a pension under the Civil Service arrangements, an individual had to be over age 50 and have served for ten or more years. Those who left voluntarily before meeting these criteria lost rights to pensions. For the Armed Forces occupational pensions were awarded only if a member had completed at least 16 years reckonable service as an officer or 22 years reckonable service as an other rank. Reckonable service is paid service after age 21 for officers or after age 18 for other ranks.
    Engagements for shorter periods were on non-pensionable terms.

    Gratuities (lump- sum payments) were awarded to those who did not serve long enough for a pension but had completed at least nine years reckonable service as an officer or 12 years reckonable service as an other rank. Gratuities were not paid to compensate for lack of pension but rather to assist the individual to settle into civilian life.

    The Social Security Act 1973 brought about changes by requiring all pension schemes to preserve pension rights for those who left service after 6th April 1975 having completed at least five years qualifying service, and having attained the age of 26. Later Social Security Acts reduced the qualifying period from five years to two years and removed the age qualification requirement. These changes were not made retrospective. Individuals receive the benefits in accordance with the scheme rules in place at the time of their retirement.
     

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  8. Forces Pension Society
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    Forces Pension Society Sponsor


    EScotia is quite right. Before 1975 pensions were paid to officers who served 16 yrs from age 21 and other ranks who served 22 yrs from age 18. They were paid immediately on departure from the Armed Forces.
     

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